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Tinting in the winter time - a good idea or not?


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#1 *Blaine B. *

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  23 June 2006 - 07:09 PM

Just wondering, if you tint in the winter time vs. the summer time, is it possible for the tint not to dry /adhere properly, or even perhaps shrink?

Let me know, thanks!
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#2 Ryker

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  25 June 2006 - 12:20 PM

I have tinted as a profession for just over 7 years now and I have never stopped. The only thing that can really hurt the tint is if it is far below freezing outside and the car is pulled out. The mounting solution can freeze and the tint be pushed off the window.

Fingers are a bit more of a problem in the winter as the summer heat helps to lay down and keep them down. I tried something new this past winter as I had put together a "tint removal kit" using 6 250W infrared heat lamps on a T board. Using this as an extra heat source and then moving it over the back window to "bake" it after the rear is done, I really had no issues with the tint. I just called it my portable SUN! The infrared heat is nice too when the shop is not as warm.......

The simple fact is that if the tint is done right and squeeged out good then it should be fine barring extreme cold. A few fingers might pop up, but those can be laid down in a few days after dry. The heat lamps set up is great if you want to really bake it on......

hope this helps
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#3 MidcoastMW

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    If you can't film it, f%#k it!

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  25 June 2006 - 12:28 PM

I have tinted as a profession for just over 7 years now and I have never stopped. The only thing that can really hurt the tint is if it is far below freezing outside and the car is pulled out. The mounting solution can freeze and the tint be pushed off the window.

Fingers are a bit more of a problem in the winter as the summer heat helps to lay down and keep them down. I tried something new this past winter as I had put together a "tint removal kit" using 6 250W infrared heat lamps on a T board. Using this as an extra heat source and then moving it over the back window to "bake" it after the rear is done, I really had no issues with the tint. I just called it my portable SUN! The infrared heat is nice too when the shop is not as warm.......

The simple fact is that if the tint is done right and squeeged out good then it should be fine barring extreme cold. A few fingers might pop up, but those can be laid down in a few days after dry. The heat lamps set up is great if you want to really bake it on......

hope this helps

:rollin
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#4 1PEECBARETTA

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  25 June 2006 - 06:02 PM

I agree with the above statments,but who cares about the winter,its 95 100 deegrese around here. :rollin
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#5 darkdan

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  25 June 2006 - 06:19 PM

Just be sure to squeege extra good in the winter.

On full metal films on my own vehicles I've managed to have a water bubble or to last from Nov to April....oops.

Also adjust the amount of time you tell them to wait before rolling down their windows. I usually tell them a week.
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