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Best Film to keep heat In/out ? (DIY)


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#1 timc4444

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  27 December 2008 - 10:38 AM

Newbie here asking the pros. I'm planning on using film to keep the heat in and out. Most films have some privacy as part of the product.. I have noticed that most talk about keeping the heat out. Any help on films that will retain the heat in the winter as well ?
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#2 TintDude

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  27 December 2008 - 11:35 AM

Tinting is not a DIY project, you need to consult professionals in you area.
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#3 Ryker

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  27 December 2008 - 06:49 PM

find a pro and get it done right....would you paint a car with spray paint?

As for the film that will keep heat in, there are some "low-E" films available but they are not as good as the other films overall. Solar film will keep you more comfortable in the winter as it will keep you from having "hot spots" and believe me I wish I had a better film on my own living room. It will hit an extra 7 to 10 degrees in the winter here with the sun coming in the northern windows. Thermostat set to 70 and it will be 77 to 80. Rest of the house suffers because the thermostat is in the living room.....that is with a film that is stated to do a TSER of 50% on a 7 foot wide, 4 foot tall window.....

So, get a good solar control film and you will love it year round.....but if you really want it to be done nice then get a pro to do it.....
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#4 blade

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  28 December 2008 - 09:22 AM

the reason you should talk with a professional is that there are many things that need to be considered when applying comm/residential window film. you run the risk of glass breakage and/or seal failure without knowing these things.

is the glass single pane, dual pane, low-e, tempered, annealed?

what directions do the windows face?

is there any shading on the glass (trees, awnings)?

what's your elevation?

these are just a few things we consider when suggesting a film type. if you just go buy film without knowing certain specs on the film....like the amount of heat the film absorbs on the glass, then you could end up with broken windows throughtout your house. then you'll be consulting another type of glass professional. :thumb
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#5 TintJunkie

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  28 December 2008 - 12:24 PM

Make sure you check the U Value on the spec charts. This refers to the ability of the film to keep the heat in. The lower the number, the better insulator.
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#6 timc4444

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  30 December 2008 - 06:22 AM

Thanks for some help. I understand that you folks are professionals and that's why I asked. I understand that you, the professional, frown on the DIY types. I'm certain that my job will not look like your job. I consider all your advice to be educational.

I did do my bedroom and it came out fine. Comparing the specs with Solargard material and the material I used was helpful.

My windows are double paned, older technology windows that have leaks. It seems almost all of the vendors have Low-E products that are safe even if my windows were new.

I can notice a difference in the room. The extremes (cold/heat) have gone away. I was able at night to put my arm out of my bed and feel the cold radiating through the glass before.

Thanks again.
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#7 tintmanlibby

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  30 December 2008 - 10:11 AM

the reason you should talk with a professional is that there are many things that need to be considered when applying comm/residential window film. you run the risk of glass breakage and/or seal failure without knowing these things.

is the glass single pane, dual pane, low-e, tempered, annealed?

what directions do the windows face?

is there any shading on the glass (trees, awnings)?

what's your elevation?

these are just a few things we consider when suggesting a film type. if you just go buy film without knowing certain specs on the film....like the amount of heat the film absorbs on the glass, then you could end up with broken windows throughtout your house. :lol2



:hmmm you guy's rule ,
maybe he should pm darkdan :thumb for more info :hmmm
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#8 timc4444

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  30 December 2008 - 08:04 PM

You folks are a protective bunch.

Could you do my job ? I'm a dentist. I still wouldn't stop you :thumb

I'm happy so far. We had a "professional" tint our office. I'll leave it at that.

If I had tons of money to spend on my house, I'd pay a pro to do it. As you know, owning your own business is tough these days (even for a dentist) and if you are willing to "try" doing it, then go for it.

I am thankful for your advice though (the useful stuff)
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#9 tint45

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  30 December 2008 - 08:21 PM

You folks are a protective bunch.

Could you do my job ? I'm a dentist. I still wouldn't stop you :hmmm

I'm happy so far. We had a "professional" tint our office. I'll leave it at that.

If I had tons of money to spend on my house, I'd pay a pro to do it. As you know, owning your own business is tough these days (even for a dentist) and if you are willing to "try" doing it, then go for it.

I am thankful for your advice though (the useful stuff)

Ballbusting will happen here, no big deal. :thumb However, to save yourself money in the long run, read Blade's post again. Alot more factors than you might think should be considered. :hmmm
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#10 Ryker

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  30 December 2008 - 08:28 PM

chose the right film or you WILL hurt the glass. Believe me, I have a broken window on my own home from choosing the right film...just had a bad edge or something....and it sucks because it will cost me between 300 and 600 to replace depending on if I replace just the middle glass or upgrade the old window completely.....

Even a pro might put on a film and you have glass failure, but at least with that you will have a warranty that will replace the window!!

If you don't care what your windows will look like, or you just have extra time and money to do it until you get it "good enough" then go ahead.....

The edge cutting is going to be one of the hardest things for you to do "good"....then of course you will want to watch out for the contamination that you will likely have that will make your windows look like there is fine grit sand paper between the film and glass.....

but, what do we know?
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#11 Ryker

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  30 December 2008 - 08:38 PM

Thanks for some help. I understand that you folks are professionals and that's why I asked. I understand that you, the professional, frown on the DIY types. I'm certain that my job will not look like your job. I consider all your advice to be educational.

I did do my bedroom and it came out fine. Comparing the specs with Solargard material and the material I used was helpful.

My windows are double paned, older technology windows that have leaks. It seems almost all of the vendors have Low-E products that are safe even if my windows were new.

I can notice a difference in the room. The extremes (cold/heat) have gone away. I was able at night to put my arm out of my bed and feel the cold radiating through the glass before.

Thanks again.


If you are happy with the results on THIS film then why are you asking about others?

What do you mean by "leaks"?? the seals are blown and you get moisture in them? if you are talking about air then you likely just need to caulk it up...

actual Low-E films are going to be expensive so be prepared. Most films will help with the heat loss....as another said check the "U" value....
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#12 timc4444

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  31 December 2008 - 06:58 AM

Only after I read the helpful posts concerning Low E values and U values can you begin to realize film is not just film. Dealers have access to products that I can't get easily.

Happy Holidays
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