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Mitch

"Bullet resistant" window film

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I agree with you bob..we are talking about half inch glass, where is the tests where just half inch glass is shot...lol... :boogie:DD

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levels 1-8 the second is an "All Glass" lay up

If this indeed all glass a safety film of any thickness can serve as a spall shield when installed to the cabin side. :lol2

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levels 1-8 the second is an "All Glass" lay up

If this indeed all glass a safety film of any thickness can serve as a spall shield when installed to the cabin side. :lol2

Sorry, if there is some confusion about our Bullet Resistant Glass Systems. This is NOT a "Spall Shield". Our "All Glass Lay up" is made by laminating multiple layers of glass bonded together with high adhesion bonding interlayers of polyvinyl butyral, polyurethane or ethylene-vinyl acetate. [ this "All Glass Lay up" ] means that there is no polycarbonate used in the lay up. This process is done under heat and pressure in an autoclave. This is our thickest and heaviest of our three Bullet Resistant Glass Systems. It is also the cheapest. A "Spall Shield" offers NO ballistic protection and is only used to keep the glass from being a secondary projectile or to keep the sharp glass fragments from doing and damage to the vehicle occupants,if you are talking about automotive use

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I agree with you bob..we are talking about half inch glass, where is the tests where just half inch glass is shot...lol... :ppdance:dunno

Hello all Texas Bob hear. Well thank you Jeff Rutherford I agree seems like 1/2" glass would be very rare in the home and building use. for the cars forget it. seems no one responded to your question. I think I would stick with bulldog's glass.

Sense no one responded to the question about " Bullet Resistant Film" being bulletproof by itself I feel that it is not.

hey customtinting very good points. where is this vaiz-tint dude and the comments?

Keep those bullets flying TBob

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levels 1-8 the second is an "All Glass" lay up

If this indeed all glass a safety film of any thickness can serve as a spall shield when installed to the cabin side. :rollin

A "Spall Shield" offers NO ballistic protection and is only used to keep the glass from being a secondary projectile or to keep the sharp glass fragments from doing and damage to the vehicle occupants,if you are talking about automotive use

No confusion here Bulldog.

I was plugging films attributes as a spall shield for bullet-proof glass that has glass on the cabin side surface as opposed to polycarbonate. That really is all safety film is designed for, holding glass fragments in place. :dunno

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levels 1-8 the second is an "All Glass" lay up

If this indeed all glass a safety film of any thickness can serve as a spall shield when installed to the cabin side. :rollin

A "Spall Shield" offers NO ballistic protection and is only used to keep the glass from being a secondary projectile or to keep the sharp glass fragments from doing and damage to the vehicle occupants,if you are talking about automotive use

No confusion here Bulldog.

I was plugging films attributes as a spall shield for bullet-proof glass that has glass on the cabin side surface as opposed to polycarbonate. That really is all safety film is designed for, holding glass fragments in place. :dunno

Hi tintjam65 thanks for the clarification on the use of "Film" as a Spall Shield. Our "All Glass" Bullet Resistant Glass is designed as a "Low Spall" system and it's use would be for applications where the end use customer needs to have glass on both sides , the strike face and the protected side for cleaning and clarity issues, as we know over time a "Film" will scratch and fog up, or delaminate. If we need a "No-Spall" application the last layer of glass on the protected side would be a minimum of 1/8" polycarbonate and a thin film of DuPont's Spall Shield. Again this whole lay up would be manufactured under heat and pressure of an autoclave. "Film" is not used in the manufacturer of Bullet Resistant Glass, as it does not have the high bonding strength or permanence of other products.

I agree that your "Safety Film" does have a wide variety of uses such as office -home window applications for protection from hurricane- forced entry and low velocity fragmentation applications.

:err

Thanks again for the clarification BD.

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Hello all, TexasBob here. I have been away for awhile ..... This is way too funny............! Where have all you amateur bulletproof film guys gone?

Back in June Customtinting and bulldog ask for test reports from all of you who make these claims about how your "Film" is bullet resistant and of course no one has responded....go figure. Could it be that you can't back up your statements?

Keep those bullets flying TBob

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Hello all, TexasBob here. I have been away for awhile ..... This is way too funny............! Where have all you amateur bulletproof film guys gone?

Back in June Customtinting and bulldog ask for test reports from all of you who make these claims about how your "Film" is bullet resistant and of course no one has responded....go figure. Could it be that you can't back up your statements?

Keep those bullets flying TBob

Thats because they have no legitimate testing. Only snake oil salesman pics. Proof is in the pudding...or the test data!!!!

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Most bullet resistant laminates are constructed from three types of material. The first material is something that absorbs the energy of the projectile. For low calibre defense, this material can be cell cast acrylic (usually 1.25" or more thick), for higher calibre and military applications it is more usually glass. When the glass breaks it absorbs the energy of the projectile. Often the strike face uses hardened glass to break up the projectile before it hits secondary layers of glass. The second type of material is usually a polycarbonate or similar to act as a spall shield. The spall shield is used to prevent fragments of glass injuring personnel behind the transparent armor - it really doesn't matter if you are hit by the projectile or the glass, they can both injure or kill. Polycarbonate works because it is virtually unbreakable and flexible (unlike acrylic) and therefore retains the fragments. For VIP and diplomatic protection cars the spall shield layer is usually 3mm or 1/8" thick. For military applications we have supplied 6mm and even 9mm polycarbonate. The type of Polycarbonate is also critical, most commodity Polycarbonate performs extremely poorly. There is a viewpoint that two 3mm layers actually act as a better spall shield than one 6mm layer. The third type of material in the laminate is in effect an adhesive between the glass and polycarbonate, or the glass and glass layers. Materials such as TPU are used for this adhesive. The TPU also is used to protect the laminate from the different expansion rates of Polycarbonate and Glass. The laminates are produced in an autoclave, often at 250 F for 8 hours.

The thickness of the glass laminate and the polycarbonate in the laminate depend on the size of the projectile and the velocity of the projectile. At HighLine Polycarbonate we typically recommend 3mm Polycarbonate for low end threats. For high end military applications the structure of the laminates are often confidential or classified.

In theory a film would act as a spall shield for low calibre, low velocity projectiles. For example a glass window with a laminated PC film would prevent fragments of glass from hitting occupants if a rock was thrown at the window. For a high velocity NATO round I would not want to use a film as a spall shield layer.

We have just published a blog post on the different types of transparent armor at http://www.highlinepc.blogspot.com if you are interested.

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Most bullet resistant laminates are constructed from three types of material. The first material is something that absorbs the energy of the projectile. For low calibre defense, this material can be cell cast acrylic (usually 1.25" or more thick), for higher calibre and military applications it is more usually glass. When the glass breaks it absorbs the energy of the projectile. Often the strike face uses hardened glass to break up the projectile before it hits secondary layers of glass. The second type of material is usually a polycarbonate or similar to act as a spall shield. The spall shield is used to prevent fragments of glass injuring personnel behind the transparent armor - it really doesn't matter if you are hit by the projectile or the glass, they can both injure or kill. Polycarbonate works because it is virtually unbreakable and flexible (unlike acrylic) and therefore retains the fragments. For VIP and diplomatic protection cars the spall shield layer is usually 3mm or 1/8" thick. For military applications we have supplied 6mm and even 9mm polycarbonate. The type of Polycarbonate is also critical, most commodity Polycarbonate performs extremely poorly. There is a viewpoint that two 3mm layers actually act as a better spall shield than one 6mm layer. The third type of material in the laminate is in effect an adhesive between the glass and polycarbonate, or the glass and glass layers. Materials such as TPU are used for this adhesive. The TPU also is used to protect the laminate from the different expansion rates of Polycarbonate and Glass. The laminates are produced in an autoclave, often at 250 F for 8 hours.

The thickness of the glass laminate and the polycarbonate in the laminate depend on the size of the projectile and the velocity of the projectile. At HighLine Polycarbonate we typically recommend 3mm Polycarbonate for low end threats. For high end military applications the structure of the laminates are often confidential or classified.

In theory a film would act as a spall shield for low calibre, low velocity projectiles. For example a glass window with a laminated PC film would prevent fragments of glass from hitting occupants if a rock was thrown at the window. For a high velocity NATO round I would not want to use a film as a spall shield layer.

We have just published a blog post on the different types of transparent armor at http://www.highlinepc.blogspot.com if you are interested.

HighLinePC, what are you adding here? if you look back through the posts you will see that the subject of how bullet resistant glass is manufactured has been well covered. Most, if not all bullet resistant laminates are manufactured using glass and not plastic. Furthermore "Spall Shield" would be the final layer in the makeup on the inside. You forgot to mention "Low Spall" and" No Spall" Also, if given a certain ballistic threat it would be a simple solution to stop a required round, there is no mystery of "confidential or classified". Your company is not an approved vendor to the US Military or Government and has no site clearance and or security clearances to manufacturer glass of a "Classified" nature. The use of "Film" for "Smash Grab applications has also been well discussed on this forum.

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