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suntint

Would You Ever Splice This Way?

19 posts in this topic

How about using a 72'' roll.

That way you end up with usable waste ;)

Thought about that, but the 23" or so leftover wouldn't be usable on this job and I don't know when I would ever need film that narrow.

Will probably just figure on using 60" rolls and passing on the cost of all the waste.

72'' roll leaves you with 47'' waste

passing the cost is mandatory

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How about using a 72'' roll.

That way you end up with usable waste ;)

Thought about that, but the 23" or so leftover wouldn't be usable on this job and I don't know when I would ever need film that narrow.

Will probably just figure on using 60" rolls and passing on the cost of all the waste.

72'' roll leaves you with 47'' waste

passing the cost is mandatory

If the windows are 97" wide and I center the swatches that is at the 48 1/2" point. The olfa knife would be set at probably about 50" on the roll, which leaves over 22" (if using a 72" roll). No windows that narrow on this job or on most other jobs I would use this film. Would use 60" film instead and have 10" leftover which would be trashed - and would pass on cost to customer.

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I would splice vertical as long as the customer understands the price ajustment, that is needed for the job,

and would make shure that the customer gets charged for all materials, including wast, u never know when u can use scraps,

so the glass is 97" and its deciding where to put the tint line, ether hide the tint line at the top or at the bottom of the glass, perferably at the top using a 72" roll and yes making your strips u will need to have a 4' or up to a 6' strat edge for the best cut, and of corse 2 peaple for the job

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Splices are unnavoidable in many situations, as TDub said : charge for it. You need to run the spliced piece in the opposite direction that you run your large piece so the pieces match color wise. Don't ask me why this works but I've done many splices and seen many done without flipping and you will see a difference if you don't. Maybe someone can come up with an explanation as to why this works.

Even on the same roll of film there can be a + or - of 3% color differentiation from one side of the roll to the other. That is why using the same side of film will always match better.

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I always discuss splice type and placement with the customer. Been bitten a couple times in my early days by assuming where I put the splice is where they would be happy having it.

They choose type and placement with recommendations from me and sign/initial off on each splice to be done.

One man's waste is another man's treasure.

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No, even from the same run the seamed edges will have a color difference.

Here is a pic of the same film but not the same side it came off the roll.

012-3.jpg

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Splices are unnavoidable in many situations, as TDub said : charge for it. You need to run the spliced piece in the opposite direction that you run your large piece so the pieces match color wise. Don't ask me why this works but I've done many splices and seen many done without flipping and you will see a difference if you don't. Maybe someone can come up with an explanation as to why this works.

In the manufacturing process there are a couple of different methods of getting the metal onto the polyester. They all involve multiple dispersal devices that send out the metal particles. If the flow is even the slightest bit heavier in one area of the width of the polyester, it gets coated more. Rarely are two sides perfectly even.

Our salesmen look for "banded" film on buildings to get them to switch over. Banding is where the coating is so uneven it can be seen at a distance on a window that hasn't been spliced.

Most mannys have gotten better over the years and the sputtered process seems to coat very evenly, but we still flip sides so that the same two factory edges are together.

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In the manufacturing process there are a couple of different methods of getting the metal onto the polyester. They all involve multiple dispersal devices that send out the metal particles. If the flow is even the slightest bit heavier in one area of the width of the polyester, it gets coated more. Rarely are two sides perfectly even.

Our salesmen look for "banded" film on buildings to get them to switch over. Banding is where the coating is so uneven it can be seen at a distance on a window that hasn't been spliced.

Like this.

003-12-1.jpg

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