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DynamicAppearance

Need A Suggestion on Film Application

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We have a hotel that needs this triangle shape area tinted to block out the sun.  It is shining on their bar and that section can't be used.  It measures roughly 17' wide, 6' tall at it's highest point, and 10' deep into the hotel.  The problem is at the bottom of the windows, they go further down past the wall about 10".  Looking for opinions on what you would do...interior film or exterior film?

 

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Here is the exterior shot from Google Maps...

 

32779372581_a02a263a51_b.jpg

Edited by DynamicAppearance

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If exterior film choice works,, I would definitely try to do exterior install.  Looks to be way easier. :twocents

 

That being said,, depending on what they want to do,,, block light = lessen amount of light/heat = diffuse light for less glare :?  

 

This might be a situation for that new light redirecting film that @WearTheFoxHat  turned us on to a year or so ago. :dunno 

 

Edited by Bham

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17 minutes ago, Bham said:

If exterior film choice works,, I would definitely try to do exterior install.  Looks to be way easier. :twocents

 

That being said,, depending on what they want to do,,, block light = lessen amount of light/heat = diffuse light for less glare :?  

 

This might be a situation for that new light redirecting film that @WearTheFoxHat  turned us on to a year or so ago. :dunno 

 

 

I thought about the 3M Light Redirecting Film, but not sure if it would work well since the glass goes up at a 45 degree angle.

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Haven't seen or used it in person,,, but I think that it is basically just a scattering process and angle of glass doesn't matter.  It is like an opaque kaleidoscope (blocking and scattering light at the same time)  Strictly grapevine stuff there.  Don't quote me on that.  

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All the examples of it shows on the flat 90 degree windows shooting about 45 degrees up.  So on an angled window it would more shooting straight out versus to the ceiling.  That is my guess anyway.

 

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Looks like a Job for the exterior stunt monkey on your crew.

 

I think the expression is " That's gonna be a sum bitch for access"

 

 

The light redirecting film definitely does not block light as your post says is the need. It blasts it farther into a space.

Light%20redirect%204pm%20Mar%2011%20look

 

Edited by WearTheFoxHat

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Definitely don't see that being interior. Maybe on the ones on the sides you could but big ones I'd go exterior. And your guy is going to hate you for taking him out of the shop for that :lol

 

 

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While not the popular view, I'd tint the inside. I'm just very anti-external unless absolutely impossible to get from the inside. The film will last longer and you'll have a better selection of film choices. 

 

The light fixture looks like it's far enough away that it shouldn't be an issue... 

 

 

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How do exterior removals go down? Can't be fun.

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