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“Patterns.3M”

Xpel

armolanusa.com
Patterns.3M

Xpel

armolanusa.com
itintforlife

Training New Installers

Training New Window Film Installers  

8 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you hire beginner tinters, or people with no tinting experience?

    • Yes
      6
    • Heck No
      2
  2. 2. If you hire beginners / no experience, how do you train them?

    • Showing my own techniques
      7
    • LLumar Training
      0
    • 3M Window Film Training
      0
    • The Tintstitute
      0
    • Other
      1
  3. 3. How long do they go through training?

    • 1-6 months
      4
    • 6+ months
      4


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Hey everyone! 

 

I wanted to put this poll up here because my shop is weighing options of training newbies. What do y'all think / what are your experiences if you hire people with little to no window tinting experience? 

Edited by itintforlife

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10 minutes ago, itintforlife said:

my shop is weighing options of training newbies.

 

 

Well you keep promoting your training, I'd assume you are going to train with your institute.

 

Honestly this thread seems like a veiled attempt at mentioning your training program. :dunno 

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Hi! 

 

Sorry it came off as a veiled attempt - was not meant to be that way at all! Simply asking to see how the majority of tinters train new people. I mentioned our program because it is a training program, although did not mean to make it promotional in any way. 

 

"Weighing options" was poor wording on my part. We are brainstorming for future trainings (whether we will offer in-shop). 

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As a former shop owner and a former trainer at LLumar, I can share this:

 

I started newbies by having them cut a picture out of window film they themselves applied to a piece of glass. We were big in window film graphics back in the eighties so there were plenty of liner tattooed pictures on display. Had them pick one they wanted to do. This gave me an idea of their working through challenges skills, how well they installed the film to the 12 x 12 glass and their ability to handle an olfa knife without cutting the glass, all in one fell swoop.

 

After the test and they start from scratch (not to the picture glass LOL) and if they don't show signs of 'getting it' within a couple months, window film installing may not be for them. Anyone with experience can see a bullshioter a mile away so, you'll know.

 

Show them how you do it but don't chastise or brow beat, if they work out a different approach than yours. I would start them the same way I approach each car. In other words break down your approach into segments (tiers if you will), they have to work at until moving on to the next. Don't be afraid to let them handle film, it will cost you money in time and film but, the sooner they know film handling the better. It'll cost you about the same to have them attend a training course (dependent upon cost of training) as it would to train them yourself.

 

Ask the newbie these questions:

Do you have any artistic skills (not autistic, artistic)? Many natural installers have an artist strain in their blood.

Can you play a musical instrument? Manual dexterity is a must.

Do you problem-solve like McGyver? Problem solving skills without the need to wait for or ask for guidance.

Have you ever installed vinyl, wallpaper, shelf-lining material, decals, etc.? Got at least a jump-start on those who have never done any of this.

 

In 18 of the 20 years I spent training newbies at LLumar, I only spied 3-4 naturals. They are rare but they're out there. Had one, who appeared to be all thumbs, take the tool apron off halfway through day two saying this isn't for him. I could tell by the end of the first day who might succedd and who would be a nightmare in waiting. Women make the best tinters because they are already meticulous and methodical. I only had two men work in my shops over the course of the 80's to early 90's, one I let go after three months, the other turned out to be a she and a damn good tinter at that.

 

This isn't the gospel according to one trainer, it's simply my input to a subject that will bring about much input from those that have been there.

 

Good luck.

 

Edit: And in the words of Cheech or Chong, you don't need no stinkin' poll (to get your answers).

 

Edited by smartie2shoes

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I'm not the best teacher in the world, and some of what S2S said I agree with...What I disagree with is letting them find their own way early on. .. I insist they learn my way until they are competent enough to install without supervision. I know my way works, and I know what happens and why, if steps are not done correctly. I have no interest in letting a newbie experament in the learning curve, and trying to figure out a way for everyone's different approach to be successful. .. Learn my way.. master it.. then if you can improve on it .. have at it. 

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i'm curious to most people's answer on this as well. i'm looking to get into tinting but haven't really determined to best way to start besides just ordering a half roll and practicing on my own car. 

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How I learned was from a shop I just cleaned panels and washed the cars after the tint was done....the 2 guys seen me chillin between cars and got on my ass to start removing window seals....the rest is history

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I have been training new and not so new tinters for longer than I wish to remember.  Back when I started I used to get lots of hate ranging from late night calls to hate emails....now everyone is a "coach " which I guess is the new catch phrase for trainer.

And we had to walk uphill in the snow to learn :)

 

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On 12/15/2017 at 4:00 PM, smartie2shoes said:

As a former shop owner and a former trainer at LLumar, I can share this:

 

I started newbies by having them cut a picture out of window film they themselves applied to a piece of glass. We were big in window film graphics back in the eighties so there were plenty of liner tattooed pictures on display. Had them pick one they wanted to do. This gave me an idea of their working through challenges skills, how well they installed the film to the 12 x 12 glass and their ability to handle an olfa knife without cutting the glass, all in one fell swoop.

 

After the test and they start from scratch (not to the picture glass LOL) and if they don't show signs of 'getting it' within a couple months, window film installing may not be for them. Anyone with experience can see a bullshioter a mile away so, you'll know.

 

Show them how you do it but don't chastise or brow beat, if they work out a different approach than yours. I would start them the same way I approach each car. In other words break down your approach into segments (tiers if you will), they have to work at until moving on to the next. Don't be afraid to let them handle film, it will cost you money in time and film but, the sooner they know film handling the better. It'll cost you about the same to have them attend a training course (dependent upon cost of training) as it would to train them yourself.

 

Ask the newbie these questions:

Do you have any artistic skills (not autistic, artistic)? Many natural installers have an artist strain in their blood.

Can you play a musical instrument? Manual dexterity is a must.

Do you problem-solve like McGyver? Problem solving skills without the need to wait for or ask for guidance.

Have you ever installed vinyl, wallpaper, shelf-lining material, decals, etc.? Got at least a jump-start on those who have never done any of this.

 

In 18 of the 20 years I spent training newbies at LLumar, I only spied 3-4 naturals. They are rare but they're out there. Had one, who appeared to be all thumbs, take the tool apron off halfway through day two saying this isn't for him. I could tell by the end of the first day who might succedd and who would be a nightmare in waiting. Women make the best tinters because they are already meticulous and methodical. I only had two men work in my shops over the course of the 80's to early 90's, one I let go after three months, the other turned out to be a she and a damn good tinter at that.

 

This isn't the gospel according to one trainer, it's simply my input to a subject that will bring about much input from those that have been there.

 

Good luck.

 

Edit: And in the words of Cheech or Chong, you don't need no stinkin' poll (to get your answers).

 

Nice to see you back Brother 

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