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Durashield

“Stek-USA”

“Patterns.3M”

Durashield
Aden

Can someone explain how they make kits nowadays

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Every once in a while I use a kit that feels like the general right shape but is off by a half inch (obviously way more than acceptable) when you let the film relax and read the fingers. When the kit is bad, it is immediately obvious: It either needs an excessive amount of stretch (enough stretch that you will see fingering and pull back like a failing vinyl wrap if you let it sit after tacking) or is so loose that you can't get the fingers down without totally misaligning the kit. What's weird is the inconsistency of some program's kits. 70 to 80 percent of the kits will snap together so nicely but then the others are just completely off.  The other weird thing is that the kit will be off on really easy pieces that need next to no stretch. Basically my question is why is it that some kits were never actually tested by the kit maker (at least that's what I'm assuming)  and others are flipping perfect from the same software company. Thanks so much cheers! 

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the designer may think different from installer ... is always good to be open for trimming , also a  helper to line up the sensors etc.

i think kits gets a lot of test before getting them on the software , but maybe should be tested by different installers...

from what i have read is used an different film  to mark the shape , than scan into computer than tested....

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Thanks for the insight! I'm at the point now where I don't plot any fog lights, tow hooks or sensors because, without those features I can sometimes save kits that would be otherwise thrown out. If, however, I know from previous installs that the kit is perfect I will definitely plot the sensors and tow hooks simply to save time. 

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Some times when you have designed a part you will find it ends up slightly too wide for a given film and what has happened in the past is the part has been "adjusted" to fit a particular width of film. So say a bumper when templated measures 25" top to bottom in the past it would have been manipulated to fit on the 24" film as most people only had 24" plotters. As time has gone on more installers have bought into the larger plotters and film widths have increased as well but the temptation is still there to make it fit thereby saving on wastage.

 

Steve 

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Oh wow that makes a lot of sense,  thanks for the insight. I guess I have to consider that kits do save time and material even if they aren't always perfect. 

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On 8/10/2018 at 11:20 PM, Aden said:

Every once in a while I use a kit that feels like the general right shape but is off by a half inch (obviously way more than acceptable) when you let the film relax and read the fingers. When the kit is bad, it is immediately obvious: It either needs an excessive amount of stretch (enough stretch that you will see fingering and pull back like a failing vinyl wrap if you let it sit after tacking) or is so loose that you can't get the fingers down without totally misaligning the kit. What's weird is the inconsistency of some program's kits. 70 to 80 percent of the kits will snap together so nicely but then the others are just completely off.  The other weird thing is that the kit will be off on really easy pieces that need next to no stretch. Basically my question is why is it that some kits were never actually tested by the kit maker (at least that's what I'm assuming)  and others are flipping perfect from the same software company. Thanks so much cheers! 

 

There are a few answers here:

 

1.  Some companies buy their designs from multiple sources, meaining that they are not all designed with the same theory.

2.  If you aren't trained by the company who's software program you use, you may be installing it differently than it was intended to be installed.

3. Film can grow or shrink if you roll it up and let it sit for a while (especially overnight), depending on the direction you roll it (liner side in vs liner side out)

 

Do you have any specific examples that we could address?

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Some of these kits may have since been fixed but the fenders 15-present gmc yukons, fenders and upper bumper on 2017 challenger srt, 2019 ford explorer bumper and 2019 jeep wrangler fenders and hood (the newest one I think its JL?) 2016-present silverado roof kit and 2019 honda oddysey bumper. Such an odd assortment of cars and some of them are so flat and easy it doesn't really make sense why the kit is off. I should note on the 2018 f150s one of the software's kit is absolutely perfect and the other needs to have 3 seems cut in the middle of the bumpers (1 on the upper and 2 on the lower) otherwise the film is just waaaaaay to far from the foglight cutouts. Additionally on 2013 qx60s one software's kit is super nice and tight to all the edges of the bumper and the other is like 1 quarter inch away on all sides but that's an older car so i'll cut them some slack

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On 8/13/2018 at 2:44 PM, XPEL Jeff said:

 

There are a few answers here:

 

1.  Some companies buy their designs from multiple sources, meaining that they are not all designed with the same theory.

2.  If you aren't trained by the company who's software program you use, you may be installing it differently than it was intended to be installed.

3. Film can grow or shrink if you roll it up and let it sit for a while (especially overnight), depending on the direction you roll it (liner side in vs liner side out)

 

Do you have any specific examples that we could address?

 

 

Jeff is correct with his three main points.  There are a few more to take into account but they are minor and minimal to these three.  Designers design with transfer tape, film, cameras, digitizers, scanners 3D and 2D Software as well as a mix of all the above..  At the end of the day it is a philosophy depending on the designers, training and company that you are dealing with and their offering.  Cost and commitment levels are something to look at as they will impact any decision as well.  Design for flat areas is simple but like anything it is an art and the more complex the curves the more specialized the designer when it comes to PPF.

 

Thank you,

 

Todd Bergman

Interwest Distribution

www.interwestdc.com

303-777-4455

todd@interwestdc.com

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