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Durashield

Stek-USA
“Patterns.3M”

Durashield

“Stek-USA”

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On 11/6/2018 at 9:32 AM, Matteo said:

 

Thanks Jeff for the answer ! 

So the main point is : leave the ends on a flatter surface !

 

We use air compressor on all edges before sending the car on its way. After that, if we found a "lifted part" it's ok to heated the part with hairdryer or heatgun ?

 

Anyway, in the case of the picture, the only solution is to replace the panel ? I think is impossible to clean that film...

 

Thanks

 

Usually, a lifted area will be dried out or have debris.  You'll likely need to replace the whole piece.

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I see this every so often customers come to me from other install shops (most recent Ferrari 488GTB). Majority of the time (it doesn't matter what type of car the person owns), some people think if 1 person charges $6500 to wrap a full car, then the next guy charges $4000 (that means the expensive guy is just gouging the price) and they want a deal so they go with the cheaper option, then end up getting a lemon of an install. That $6500 has now become $4000 + removal (which can get very pricey) + $6500

 

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Common rookie problem. Always always double and triple check your work. With PPF edge's need to be gone over and sealed. The picture shown is absolutely installer error. Always check your edges and make sure they are sealed. And an installer does not need an air compressor to make this work.

Edited by TINTZEUS

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No compressor necessary. Prior to install, you need to visualize the air movement and impact zone as that particular vehicle would be moving down the road (as a wind tunnel demonstration) and what will be the affects. That particular install was plotted and prolly not setting for a couple days afterwards. Sometimes you have to bulk install as you would a tint on a vehicle without software patterns. Plotters are amazing but not always the best way to go.

Cheers

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On 30/11/2018 at 9:16 PM, drtint said:

No compressor necessary. Prior to install, you need to visualize the air movement and impact zone as that particular vehicle would be moving down the road (as a wind tunnel demonstration) and what will be the affects. That particular install was plotted and prolly not setting for a couple days afterwards. Sometimes you have to bulk install as you would a tint on a vehicle without software patterns. Plotters are amazing but not always the best way to go.

Cheers

 

"prolly not setting for a couple days afterwards" that could be a cause. Always wait a couple of day after the installation before delivery.

Edited by Matteo

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On 12/2/2018 at 3:27 AM, Matteo said:

 

"prolly not setting for a couple days afterwards" that could be a cause. Always wait a couple of day after the installation before delivery.

 

No need to let anything sit for days.  Impossible to run a scalable business if you can't move cars through in a single day. 

 

The key to success on kits is proper alignment.  Simply scan as you complete each section so that you can fix any alignment errors before the film is adhered to strongly.  If you happen to miss anything, it will be revealed by the compressor so that you can fix as necessary.  

 

Bulk installs can have lifted edges or adhesion issues as well, so I would recommend these techniques for all types of application.

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Agree with Jeff if I were in Texas. I installed in Vegas for a number of years and one day installs were standard but when you get near St. Louis or up in the Chicago with 10 below, the vehicle needs to sit a couple days. Frozen snow and rain are a shops nightmare 

Cheers

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I use my jiffy steamer to check edges.  If the steamer makes the ppf lift, it was going to lift anyways.  The steamer also "highlights"  an edge that is not fully secured.   After all edges are checked and laid down properly, I use a heat gun to seal all the edges.    Heat guns erase the memory that ppf has and seal the edge to stop the ppf from lifting.   

 

If possible, we always keep our work over night so we can double check edges b4 the car is delivered to the customer. 

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