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Maestro Sam

Applying PPF profitable?

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Hey Guys,

I am new to this forum and I was dwelling on this website for a couple of weeks! I currently do a lot of detailing work, mostly high-end detailing. I specialize in paint correction and ceramic coating vehicles. However, a lot of my clients want ppf done on their personal vehicles and so I am working with a mobile ppf specialist. In the near future, I would want to add this in to my arsenal due to the fact that the mobile ppf specialist is sometimes busy on the days I need cars filmed. My question is, is ppf profitable? How long does it really take to master ppf? 

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I'd venture to guess it's more profitable than the detailing is, it certainly is more profitable than tint. As far as a timeframe to master goes there's too many variables to really say. Personally I've been installing PPF for about seven years and I wouldn't claim to be a master. I would expect proficiency after around 100 vehicles of different types and complexity. 

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took me about 20 cars to get a hold of it , been doing it for 5 years and i still learn, mobile install is not my favorite , you will need a shop or a clean bay , with good lighting.

add to that that lately everybody wants perfect install, some think it takes 30minutes for a full front and they can wait till is installed ...and the list goes on

keep in mind initial investment: training , plotter , fees for software, fees for cuts, material , than more material , material , did i say material? my cc goes skyrocket when i get rolls.....

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13 hours ago, highplains said:

I'd venture to guess it's more profitable than the detailing is, it certainly is more profitable than tint. As far as a timeframe to master goes there's too many variables to really say. Personally I've been installing PPF for about seven years and I wouldn't claim to be a master. I would expect proficiency after around 100 vehicles of different types and complexity. 

 

Thanks for the response highplains. What makes ppf so difficult? Is it the cutting or all the elements that could affect the outcome of the install? 

53 minutes ago, PRatx said:

took me about 20 cars to get a hold of it , been doing it for 5 years and i still learn, mobile install is not my favorite , you will need a shop or a clean bay , with good lighting.

add to that that lately everybody wants perfect install, some think it takes 30minutes for a full front and they can wait till is installed ...and the list goes on

keep in mind initial investment: training , plotter , fees for software, fees for cuts, material , than more material , material , did i say material? my cc goes skyrocket when i get rolls.....

 

Thanks for the response Patx. What kind of software do you use? Can I film two whole cars using one roll of film? How much is a roll of film. I am planning to use the DAP program in the future and was wondering how much the software was, monthly. If there is any other good programs out, please inform me. I have read a lot of threads but none of them talks about the cost of different pattern software or go in to depth about each of them.

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As others mention the initial cost and then the cost to hone your skills is pretty crazy. One of the big reasons not anyone can just start doing it. You need that commitment. I must admit in the early days i almost packed it in with the amount of times i would take off a panel and redo it because i was not happy with the quality. not a good feeling scrunching up any profits and throwing them in the bin.

 

I slashed my overheads by changing film providers (for other reasons) and can make good money per job. All those things will come into play as you get into it.

 

Good Luck! :cool

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1 hour ago, Supreme said:

I must admit in the early days i almost packed it in with the amount of times i would take off a panel and redo it because i was not happy with the quality. not a good feeling scrunching up any profits and throwing them in the bin.

:yeah no feeling quite like wading up $100 worth of film just to toss it in the trash to make you question why you're doing what you're doing. 

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A few things to cover. First, yes it's profitable when you make the investment to actually learn and practice. Going to a class is just scratching the surface and will arm you with the tools of knowledge to use in PPF, but knowing and using are 2 different animals. The amount of time it takes individuals to learn this craft can vary, but my numbers that I use are usually pretty accurate. It takes about a dozen cars to get comfortable with the film you are using. That means dialing in the solutions, knowing the stretch, figuring out the right tools, etc... It takes about 50 cars under your belt to get efficient with your installs. That means maximizing your time, minimizing your film waste without losing the quality of the product you are pumping out. Once you have about 50 cars, you'll start to learn more tips and tricks throughout your tenure that will make the installs easier or cleaner. The estimated investment to which I think is realistic is $10-15k to get started and moving forward. You are going to burn through plenty of film just trying to hone in your skills and get to the point where you can move forward. I can tell you that PPF is more profitable that Tint and Detailing. If you are a one man show, you should be able to avg. at least $200/hr. once you get through those initial 15-20 cars. 

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