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Benefits of tinting over factory tint ons trucks, SUVs and vans

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1 minute ago, TomTint said:

  

 

  Agree. ..but the truth of the matter is that the tint industry has lagged far behind the glass industry for decades. They have always been and likely always will be the red headed stepchild. While film has gotten "better" in the past 8-10 years...the OEM glass had quadrupled in advancements..thus the film biz is once again behind the curve. 

 Remember..the glass industry has HAD to improve and become pro active due to federal efficiency mandates ..they either improve or they are out of business. 

 The film industry has always been re-active...wait and see type mentality... by the time they react..it's already too late.. 

been that way for decades... nothing is going to change. 

I absolutely agree with you and that is something important to always remember. Thank you for that. 

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Along with what @TomTint was saying,, the new regulation for heat efficiency in new construction is mandating either tinting the windows with a film that meets these standards or using or replacing existing glass that will meet these standards.  Well, the glass companies are making glass that surpasses these standards.  New construction and most remodels would rather use glass with no film that meets proper standards, rather than glass with a film that will fail or have to be replaced before the life of the structure. 

 

I also remember a rather "smart" member of saying that the new advancements in automotive factory glass is on par if not above what we apply.  

Edited by Bham

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2 minutes ago, Bham said:

Along with what @TomTint was saying,, the new regulation for heat efficiency in new construction is mandating either tinting the windows with a film that meets these standards or using or replacing existing glass that will meet these standards.  Well, the glass companies are making glass that surpasses these standards.  New construction and most remodels would rather use glass with no film that meets proper standards, rather than glass with a film that will fail or have to be replaced before the life of the structure. 

 

I also remember rather "smart" member of saying that the new advancements in automotive factory glass is on par if not above what we apply.  

Hey @Bham. Good to see you!! I agree with all of the above. My only contention is that just because we are matched or equalled in any area be it automotive or residential/commercial should not mean that what we do as a whole is negated, obsolete, no longer valid, or beneficial. If everyone is meeting what we are capable of then we are still besting them in that we can apply that same benefit or performance amount on top of what is already there with a smaller improvement, but one nonetheless and that smaller improvement is usually noticeable and worth it to the consumer...that is my feeling. 

 

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Just now, Sunbreakers said:

Hey @Bham. Good to see you!! I agree with all of the above. My only contention is that just because we are matched or equalled in any area be it automotive or residential/commercial should not mean that what we do as a whole is negated, obsolete, no longer valid, or beneficial. If everyone is meeting what we are capable of then we are still besting them in that we can apply that same benefit or performance amount on top of what is already there with a smaller improvement, but one nonetheless and that smaller improvement is usually noticeable and worth it to the consumer...that is my feeling. 

 

 

Agreed, and my thoughts might be a little "vague".  I'm not saying our industry is going anywhere, the smart people have also said that anything the glass companies can produce, we can make "better" even if only slightly, by applying our products.  So we aren't going anywhere, it's just getting harder to "maintain" with some of the newer advancements.

 

I don't think safety film applications will ever go anywhere.  They won't ever be able to make glass unbreakable :lol  

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6 minutes ago, Bham said:

Along with what @TomTint was saying,, the new regulation for heat efficiency in new construction is mandating either tinting the windows with a film that meets these standards or using or replacing existing glass that will meet these standards.  Well, the glass companies are making glass that surpasses these standards.  New construction and most remodels would rather use glass with no film that meets proper standards, rather than glass with a film that will fail or have to be replaced before the life of the structure. 

 

I also remember a rather "smart" member of saying that the new advancements in automotive factory glass is on par if not above what we apply.  

 

 Eastman had Enerlogic......new fancy super duper bla bla bla.. and it shit the bed. ...they couldn't make it , installers couldn't install it and it's price point made it unattractive on most legitimate ROI audits. 3M has Thinsulite ...and at 7.00 psi +\-. C. It is NEVER going to show a ROI in under 50 years. Same with Ecolux. .. For the example.. take VEP 35 ( Enerlogic ) it has a TSER in the 75-78% area it had a .03 ish emmisivity and it was roughly 3.00 PSF to buy.. and a total pita to install. Now take there VE35..  basic low E no frills . It was roughly 1.30 PSF to buy..and also has a mid 70s TSER... and .28-30 Emissivity.. ( to the best of my memory) ... and as easy to install as a basic silver.  

 That means that the TSER is basically a wash..and the film has to save 1.50 - 1.75 more heat loss PSF ..just to get on par with VE35 based on ROI...this did not account for the added grief that came along with installing the VEP.. 

 So what does this have to do with things today ? .. this... Film mfrs try to wheel out all these "new" films.. at $3.00 + PSF. .. and new glass is soooo efficient and reduces so much solar heat gain without film already... ROI for these films is so long... they do not make financial seance to building owners, managers or ESCOs. 

 Add to that ... the next wave of glass in commercuand resi is going to triple pane.. ... film is DOA on that unless you want to hang it outside.. 

 Now back to auto... in the next few years the CAFE mandates are set to be re evaluated and more demanding. .. that is going to force automakers to further improve the glass they utilize. 

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17 minutes ago, Bham said:

 

Agreed, and my thoughts might be a little "vague".  I'm not saying our industry is going anywhere, the smart people have also said that anything the glass companies can produce, we can make "better" even if only slightly, by applying our products.  So we aren't going anywhere, it's just getting harder to "maintain" with some of the newer advancements.

 

I don't think safety film applications will ever go anywhere.  They won't ever be able to make glass unbreakable :lol  

 

  Retro fit safety film will be popular for the foreseeable future. But new construction is already phasing out glass in high risk areas. Opting for acrylic or plexi or other resin based product. 

Edited by TomTint

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Please forgive me if I am wrong, but most "factory tinted" windows are AS3.  This means that they are tempered glass with lower than a 70% light transmittance.  While they can be laminated, most car manufacturers do not do so.  AS1 stamped windows (windshields) and a few front roll-ups are laminated.  AS2 windows are are windows with tempered glass with a light transmittance of 70% or higher.  It is easy to tell if AS3 roll-ups are laminated or not, look at the top of the glass.  How can you tell if the cargo windows are laminated?  And, if they are not laminated how do they reject more solar energy?  I was under the impression that solar control windows were double and triple pane windows.  There is a lot of difference between architectural glass and auto glass.  I am having a difficult time seeing how adding a layer of film over automotive temper glass is not beneficial for heat rejection, uv rejection and safety (it holds all the little pieces together.  And, even if the glass is laminated, it would provide more heat rejection.  I guess I am being a bit long winded to ask where are you getting your numbers for a "factory tinted" windows having a TSER of 70%

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3 minutes ago, MastersTint1414 said:

Please forgive me if I am wrong, but most "factory tinted" windows are AS3.  This means that they are tempered glass with lower than a 70% light transmittance.  While they can be laminated, most car manufacturers do not do so.  AS1 stamped windows (windshields) and a few front roll-ups are laminated.  AS2 windows are are windows with tempered glass with a light transmittance of 70% or higher.  It is easy to tell if AS3 roll-ups are laminated or not, look at the top of the glass.  How can you tell if the cargo windows are laminated?  And, if they are not laminated how do they reject more solar energy?  I was under the impression that solar control windows were double and triple pane windows.  There is a lot of difference between architectural glass and auto glass.  I am having a difficult time seeing how adding a layer of film over automotive temper glass is not beneficial for heat rejection, uv rejection and safety (it holds all the little pieces together.  And, even if the glass is laminated, it would provide more heat rejection.  I guess I am being a bit long winded to ask where are you getting your numbers for a "factory tinted" windows having a TSER of 70%

 

The lamination in the roll up windows on autos is not for solar energy rejection.  It is mainly for sound deadening and holding broken glass together.  

Naturally adding film would add more heat rejection and even more shard protection.  :thumb  

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Yes, in many cases laminated glass on roll ups is a way for mfrs to make the cabin more soundproof. It also fills that requirement of side windows needing to be safety glass. ( 2/4/1) .. laminated glass is also more energy efficient than tempered.. i.e. It increases fuel conomy ..3/4/1.. now add to that the fact that the laminate also reduces UVA/UVB...4/4/1... now add high efficiency glass that's.. laminated ( think MB or other high end imports ) .. and the REAL benefit of adding film... becomes negligible. Outside of appearance.. there is little to no measurable benefit.

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