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Guest Tint 999

Dry adhesive films on tempered glass

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Guest Tint 999

Often these days residential IG units are made and fitted with the rough side on the inside (surface4).

How can aged dry adhesive films be removed from the tempered glass surface without using a blade to avoid scratch risk?

 

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Guest Tint 999
13 hours ago, Guest Tint 999 said:

Often these days residential IG units are made and fitted with the rough side on the inside (surface4).

How can aged dry adhesive films be removed from the tempered glass surface without using a blade to avoid scratch risk?

Has anyone any experience trying a steamer to allow all the adhesive to come off with the film on one piece as can be done with PS adhesive auto films perhaps?

 

 

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Guest Tint999

Has anyone have experience with a steamer to achieve this?

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You’d probably get the top layer off easy with a steamer. Possible damage to seals if the glass got hot enough or it could fudge up the paint on the frame if water based latex is used. Have used it on commercial jobs before but it was aluminum frames, single pane tempered and PS film. :dunno 

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Guest Tint 999

Hi Tint Eastwood,

 

Thanks for your reply. Yes it works on PS great as I removed a back van window auto film once with an old electric jug steam.

 

Problem I have here is often the new I.G. units fitted locally have rough side on #4, we're talking alloy frames, but suspect the steaming might be pretty slow, and if removing aged baked on DA unsure if steaming would do it.....and the flat glass films that usually best suit the needs of the customer being that of I.G. units are Dual Reflective DA. I often wonder why adhesives need to be quite as good, as replacement is eventually necessary!

 

I am doing myself out of work explaining the future risks to customers of potential scratch risk if some or all of the glass is rough side #4 upon the need to remove later.....

 

I don't want to get into a durability debate on here, but in my experience in residential installations in an area with high annual sunshine hrs, if a good quality glazing film generally does around 10 yrs before showing signs of any degradation then it has done ok, and this is the reason I am reluctant to just go ahead and install on rough side in many situations because it will be me facing removal at some stage.

 

However, if I can find a practical method of removing off rough side without risk of scratch damage then there is no issue, plus it may help others here as well, as I believe this to be a common thing outside my own area in other parts of the world as glass manufacturers obviously do not seem to be concerned about glass orientation on the make up of I.G. units.

 

Given we know it's is not the blade itself but the blade knocking off the tip of the rough glass surface and being dragged along the glass surface that causes the scratching, An idea I thought of was to make up a low volume high pressure water spray fitted in such a way that is sprays onto the leading edge of a triumph blade with the theory being that it kept fine glass fragments away, however this is negated by the likely build up of adhesive on the blade during removal also trapping glass fragments.....

 

Anyone's input greatly appreciated.

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On 5/4/2019 at 5:49 PM, Guest Tint 999 said:

Hi Tint Eastwood,

 

Thanks for your reply. Yes it works on PS great as I removed a back van window auto film once with an old electric jug steam.

 

Problem I have here is often the new I.G. units fitted locally have rough side on #4, we're talking alloy frames, but suspect the steaming might be pretty slow, and if removing aged baked on DA unsure if steaming would do it.....and the flat glass films that usually best suit the needs of the customer being that of I.G. units are Dual Reflective DA. I often wonder why adhesives need to be quite as good, as replacement is eventually necessary!

 

I am doing myself out of work explaining the future risks to customers of potential scratch risk if some or all of the glass is rough side #4 upon the need to remove later.....

 

I don't want to get into a durability debate on here, but in my experience in residential installations in an area with high annual sunshine hrs, if a good quality glazing film generally does around 10 yrs before showing signs of any degradation then it has done ok, and this is the reason I am reluctant to just go ahead and install on rough side in many situations because it will be me facing removal at some stage.

 

However, if I can find a practical method of removing off rough side without risk of scratch damage then there is no issue, plus it may help others here as well, as I believe this to be a common thing outside my own area in other parts of the world as glass manufacturers obviously do not seem to be concerned about glass orientation on the make up of I.G. units.

 

Given we know it's is not the blade itself but the blade knocking off the tip of the rough glass surface and being dragged along the glass surface that causes the scratching, An idea I thought of was to make up a low volume high pressure water spray fitted in such a way that is sprays onto the leading edge of a triumph blade with the theory being that it kept fine glass fragments away, however this is negated by the likely build up of adhesive on the blade during removal also trapping glass fragments.....

 

Anyone's input greatly appreciated.

My first question is Why are you on here posting as a guest ................ ? . From what i have been reading so far you are in the window film biz, however this question has been asked many times and the answer from the Top is the dry scrape method . IMOP that would Not be the best of options, I have seen many ways of trying to remove CDA with no avail on the rough side of the glass. I have been in the film biz for awhile now and I have an idea on how the removal of a CDF would be the easiest and safest way,. So I ask you why do you sell and install a film with CDF.......................................................?

Edited by MikeMN

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Guest Tint 999

Hi MikeMN,

Thanks for your response.

I am not a member, however If I am not supposed to be or allowed to be posting as a guest please let me know?

Would you like to share your idea on the removal of dry adhesive films on the rough side of toughened glass?

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There is no magical way to remove CDF at the moment. We have had some success removing the top layer , spraying Epic Orange straight ( not diluted ) and bagging it. Be careful around painted areas and wear gloves. 

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On 5/4/2019 at 5:49 PM, Guest Tint 999 said:

Given we know it's is not the blade itself but the blade knocking off the tip of the rough glass surface and being dragged along the glass surface that causes the scratching, An idea I thought of was to make up a low volume high pressure water spray fitted in such a way that is sprays onto the leading edge of a triumph blade with the theory being that it kept fine glass fragments away, however this is negated by the likely build up of adhesive on the blade during removal also trapping glass fragments.....

 

I'm no expert by any means, but it seems this is a no win situation.  Given the above statement being true, even if you can get down to where you are dealing with just adhesive left on the glass, using anything to remove it is going to cause some sort of damage.  If you use plastic scrapers on chemically soaked adhesive, I would think the build up of the glass particles is still going to scratch the glass. Much like an ice scraper can if there is a particle under it other than ice.

 

If you use four aught steel wool on soaked adhesive you are going to spiderweb the glass with swirls.  Although this seems the best method possibly.  ATR adhesive remover and some steel wool and elbow grease.  Alloy frames shouldn't be affected, you would just need to control run off of chemicals.  

 

When installing and not being able to use a blade to pre-clean due to rough glass or improper surface, it's always a white scrub pad and a denture brush or toothbrush to clean with and I don't see either one of those being very effective unless your chemical is really good at breaking up adhesive residue.  

 

Keeping up with this one.  Interested in the solution.   

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Guest reaper

how is this even an issue?! ive been tinting for ten years now and have never scratched a window all I use is, dawn dish soap and water, and a six inch razor, now that being said if you know its old film or not that doesn't matter try perculatting the film wet it and bag it before you even pull the first layer so it can help loosin the adhesive then use soap water and a razor and get er done

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