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Guest mart_o

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Courtesy LLumar Training CD:

Splicing: 

Sometimes, rear windows may be too curved to heat form successfully. Splicing smaller strips together may be necessary, yet there are ways to retain the ?seamless? one-piece look. When defroster wires are present, they can be used as blade guides and almost perfectly hide the seams.

This method of joining two pieces of film involves overlapping two strips along a defroster wire and cutting through both layers, removing the excess film. The result is two pieces of film butted perfectly together since they were cut simultaneously).

1. Film is cut on the exterior of the pane into strips, roughly matching the curve of the defroster wires. Each piece can be heat formed independently to reduce the need for further strips.

2. The upper strip is installed so that its lower edge overlaps a selected wire.

3. The next piece is installed so that its upper edge overlaps the same wire.

4. The overlap region is sprayed with Film-On to allow the hand to slide smoothly across the pane. The film is cut either on the top or bottom edge of the wire.  Be sure to use a fresh knifepoint, and use a very light to moderate pressure to ride along the wire edge without cutting through or across it. (The technique must be practiced, of course, on training windows to gain the necessary skill to avoid damage to the wires.)

5. The detached film can then be pulled away.

6. The result is a virtually invisible splice.

With practice, a steady hand, and markers on the exterior of the glass to serve as visual guides, such splices can be performed, where necessary, on windows with no defroster wires.

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:thumb:lol2

Courtesy LLumar Training CD:
Splicing:?

Sometimes, rear windows may be too curved to heat form successfully. Splicing smaller strips together may be necessary, yet there are ways to retain the ?seamless? one-piece look. When defroster wires are present, they can be used as blade guides and almost perfectly hide the seams.

This method of joining two pieces of film involves overlapping two strips along a defroster wire and cutting through both layers, removing the excess film. The result is two pieces of film butted perfectly together since they were cut simultaneously).

1. Film is cut on the exterior of the pane into strips, roughly matching the curve of the defroster wires. Each piece can be heat formed independently to reduce the need for further strips.

2. The upper strip is installed so that its lower edge overlaps a selected wire.

3. The next piece is installed so that its upper edge overlaps the same wire.

4. The overlap region is sprayed with Film-On to allow the hand to slide smoothly across the pane. The film is cut either on the top or bottom edge of the wire.? Be sure to use a fresh knifepoint, and use a very light to moderate pressure to ride along the wire edge without cutting through or across it. (The technique must be practiced, of course, on training windows to gain the necessary skill to avoid damage to the wires.)

5. The detached film can then be pulled away.

6. The result is a virtually invisible splice.

With practice, a steady hand, and markers on the exterior of the glass to serve as visual guides, such splices can be performed, where necessary, on windows with no defroster wires.

[*]325442

So simple even a 3 year old can make it look like a pro!

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So simple even a 3 year old can make it look like a pro!

[*]325540

I have a stepson who lives with his dad... there he gets everything done for him by the adults in the house, including grandma... 13 years old and still does not know how to cut his own meat on the dinner plate.

This is a by product of how political correctness has affected everything around us... even how a parent might go about teaching their child the ways of the world... and certainly not by being politically correct through people pleasing a child in development.

It carries over into today's young adults... they seem to have no ability to think things through to resolution.

Maybe this chap was never introduced to splicing and not seen it done, rather only has heard of it. :DD

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Had one of those fine California tinters once splain to a group of newbies in training that the tint on my (then) Taurus back glass is how all one-piece installs should look. :dunno

I interrupted him to say ::beer:: make that a three-piece invisi-seam install... :lol:lol2

The old timers know what it's like to make magic out of seams and defrosters. Cali man could not find the seams... had to go inside to find them.

Same with my clients... they never new when there was a seam or not... oh... those were the days... :lol:lol2

Oops! Almost forgot... I cut all, yes all, my invisi-seams on the outside, then installed each piece. That's why my back is the way it is today... getting in and out of a car back seat all those times. :lol

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I have had situations where I had friends hanging out at the shop, and it was very obvious that I was shrinking two pieces for the rear. They were skeptical about how it would look when I was finished, so afterward, I would challenge them to tell me where the seam is. They couldn't find it. One of those was the Taurus.

I would never tell the customer it was done in two though.

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