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Newbie window tinting - Kalamazoo, Michigan


Guest JohnnyC

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Guest JohnnyC

Hey all! I've been reading the site and come up with lots of good tips and tricks to try out, but I figured I'd trolled long enough and it was time to post something.

I'm working on tinting my 2000 Daewoo Lanos 4 door. Only the two rear roll down windows and the "back glass" (back glass?) will be tinted. I have had my cars professionally tinted in the past, but I've decided to give it a try myself. I generally learn quickly and have decent success with most things I try, so... why not this.

Here's a list of what I have ready to go:

1. Distilled water all prepped with some soap and a nice spray bottle to apply it.

2. A heat gun here with one round tip attachment and a fanning attachment (designed to flatten out the area it shoots the heat).

3. 2 Rolls of 2x6.5 ft 5% Charcoal grey Axius window tint. Supposedly the "best quality from that maker" (extra metalized).

4. A nice rubber squeegee and an assortment of cards to choose from.

5. One large laminated door for cutting on.

6. Drier Sheets (not sure if I should use this method or not)

7. The rear dash is removed and I'll have it covered in plastic wrap before I begin.

8. Some tape (masking and scotch)

9. some butcher paper.

10. Lint-less cloth (a few of them)

11. one friend to lend an extra pair of hands to help.

(Notice anything missing from my above list?)

I have some experience with applying this kind of thing in the past. I used to work for a sign shop applying vinyl to all sorts of things. I am completely aware that they are two different processes, but they definitely have similarities.

1st question:

Realizing that this will be my first window tinting attempt, which method do you recommend I try for the shrinking? I have read through many of the methods and comments about them that people have posted, but I'm still unsure which method is the best choice for me.

Here is a pic of the back end of my car. As you can see, there is a slight curve to the back glass, but it isn't horrid.

*note*... There isn't anything on the rear glass anymore... I took this pic days after I bought this car.

MyLanosRear.jpg

so... which method do you think I should use? OR should I do the cut method and attempt to cut strips to do the back window and hide the seams along the defrost lines??

2nd question:

My rear windows don't roll down all the way and it's rather difficult to get masking tape adequately along the bottom rubber trim, is there a really good method of doing this part? (I have actually considered removing the glass from my rear door windows, tinting it, then putting them back in).

Most of my concern is with the back glass... Everyone seems to tell me that is the trickiest part.

Hell... if any of you are from the Kalamazoo, Michigan area... let me know. I could offer you some beer or payment or something to come by my house and instruct me as I lose my tinting virginity.

(if this goes well... I have a few friends that will want me to tint their cars as well)

Thanks for your comments in advance

- JohnnyC

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Guest JohnnyC
Seam it.

You don't have to run the tape all the way back.  Just make sure it starts where the glass does.

[*]378352

I'm not quite understanding what you mean... hehe :gasp Sorry. I'm just not sure which thing you're talking about or what I'm supposed to do exactly with your suggestion. :DD

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Guest JohnnyC
just go find someone to do it professionally,

99.9% chance you will not be successful. :gasp

[*]378363

Wow... thanks for the vote of confidence :DD . So how many times did you screw up tint before you managed to get your first one installed properly?

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I have had my cars professionally tinted in the past, but I've decided to give it a try myself. I generally learn quickly and have decent success with most things I try, so... why not this.

Here's a list of what I have ready to go:

1. Distilled water all prepped with some soap and a nice spray bottle to apply it.

2. A heat gun here with one round tip attachment and a fanning attachment (designed to flatten out the area it shoots the heat).

3. 2 Rolls of 2x6.5 ft 5% Charcoal grey Axius window tint. Supposedly the "best quality from that maker" (extra metalized).

4. A nice rubber squeegee and an assortment of cards to choose from.

5. One large laminated door for cutting on.

6. Drier Sheets (not sure if I should use this method or not)

7. The rear dash is removed and I'll have it covered in plastic wrap before I begin.

8. Some tape (masking and scotch)

9. some butcher paper.

10. Lint-less cloth (a few of them)

11. one friend to lend an extra pair of hands to help.

(Notice anything missing from my above list?)

[*]378349

What I see lacking from the list above is much more $$ in film needed for redos and experience if your wanting the car to look professionally done as they have in the past whe nyou've had a pro do them B4.

Not being mean on ya..just the truth. there's no way with using the exact amount of film needed for the car...and NEVER have tinted B4 that you'll do the kind of job that'll make you glad you didn't spend the extra getting a pro to do it.

Now if you truely are wanting to learn to tint, by all means tint your car ( a great car to learn on is your own) but know that you MUST have more film on hand (unless your not too fussy with some creases,light gaps,dirt,bubbles,etc) Just don't expect your friends to line up wanting thiers done :gasp

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Good luck and remember ?it?s just film? don?t get mad at it and you will learn enough to know if you want to do it again.

If it is a real professional look you are going for my advice is drop and roll like you are on fire and go to a shop. It is harder to apply film than vinyl, for one thing you are going to be looking thru the film. Again good luck and you are on the right track by reading the post on tinddude.

:gasp

Hey all! I've been reading the site and come up with lots of good tips and tricks to try out, but I figured I'd trolled long enough and it was time to post something.

I'm working on tinting my 2000 Daewoo Lanos 4 door. Only the two rear roll down windows and the "back glass" (back glass?) will be tinted. I have had my cars professionally tinted in the past, but I've decided to give it a try myself. I generally learn quickly and have decent success with most things I try, so... why not this.

Here's a list of what I have ready to go:

1. Distilled water all prepped with some soap and a nice spray bottle to apply it.

2. A heat gun here with one round tip attachment and a fanning attachment (designed to flatten out the area it shoots the heat).

3. 2 Rolls of 2x6.5 ft 5% Charcoal grey Axius window tint. Supposedly the "best quality from that maker" (extra metalized).

4. A nice rubber squeegee and an assortment of cards to choose from.

5. One large laminated door for cutting on.

6. Drier Sheets (not sure if I should use this method or not)

7. The rear dash is removed and I'll have it covered in plastic wrap before I begin.

8. Some tape (masking and scotch)

9. some butcher paper.

10. Lint-less cloth (a few of them)

11. one friend to lend an extra pair of hands to help.

(Notice anything missing from my above list?)

I have some experience with applying this kind of thing in the past. I used to work for a sign shop applying vinyl to all sorts of things. I am completely aware that they are two different processes, but they definitely have similarities.

1st question:

Realizing that this will be my first window tinting attempt, which method do you recommend I try for the shrinking? I have read through many of the methods and comments about them that people have posted, but I'm still unsure which method is the best choice for me.

Here is a pic of the back end of my car. As you can see, there is a slight curve to the back glass, but it isn't horrid.

*note*... There isn't anything on the rear glass anymore... I took this pic days after I bought this car.

MyLanosRear.jpg

so... which method do you think I should use? OR should I do the cut method and attempt to cut strips to do the back window and hide the seams along the defrost lines??

2nd question:

My rear windows don't roll down all the way and it's rather difficult to get masking tape adequately along the bottom rubber trim, is there a really good method of doing this part? (I have actually considered removing the glass from my rear door windows, tinting it, then putting them back in).

Most of my concern is with the back glass... Everyone seems to tell me that is the trickiest part.

Hell... if any of you are from the Kalamazoo, Michigan area... let me know. I could offer you some beer or payment or something to come by my house and instruct me as I lose my tinting virginity.

(if this goes well... I have a few friends that will want me to tint their cars as well)

Thanks for your comments in advance

- JohnnyC

[*]378349

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Guest willie

Good luck dude. The only thing I can add that the others havent is take your time and go slowly. Patience is a virtue here. Listen to TW though and get you alittle more film to have on hand.

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