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Need advice on buffer/polisher


Guest TravisT

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Guest TravisT

Hi,

I am new to the forums, and have been poking around on here for the past week or so. I am very interested in learning more about being a good detailer - mainly for my own vehicles. I am in the USAF and don't have too much time for side jobs, but an occasional one here and there may be in my future.

My main question right now is what would be a good polisher to start off with? I thought about just getting the infamous DW849, since every body shop I have been to seems to have this polisher in use. At the same time, I know that in the wrong hands, this can do serious paint damage. I currently have an el-cheapo craftsman orbital buffer that I have been using for many years, but I just don't think it is going to turn out a GOOD detailing job (or at least I haven't been lucky enough with it). I have also considered the PC DA polisher.

The main project I need to do is to buff many light scratches and swirl marks out of my black 2004 GMC Sierra. I definately don't want to risk damaging the paint, but I know the only way to get a good deep gloss is to machine polish it, followed by a glaze and then a quality wax. I also have a 90 mustang (silver) that I intended to use as a test vehicle - I am not nearly as concerned about the paint job on this vehicle - it's in pretty bad shape and in the next couple of years will see a paint job anyway. I also want to make sure whatever polisher I get will last and be able to be used for my future polish/wax jobs. Can anyone make a good recommendation for a rookie detailer? Thanks,

TravisT

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I have a Makita buffer, it was around 200 bucks or so.

If you are IMO you should try it on the silver car 1st.

I suggest using foam pads, white for compound and black for polish.

If you're not familiar with the process you can make black look like :stop .

Black, for me is a three stage process and when I did one I charged almost triple.

Keep that joker moving, whatever you do, don't stay too long on one spot or you will be asking how to

do paint repair next. :evilgrin

Good luck, buffing is teadious and hard on the back....

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Guest TravisT

Oh, I'm up for the challenge - no doubt.

Like you suggested, I plan on trying the mustang first. The paint is pretty bad, but I figure that will give me some practice with the new buffer. Makita is a good brand, but my personal preference is between the dewalt and the PC. I own a lot of PC tools and love every one of them, but I like the dewalt also. I guess what I really want to hear is whether I should get a standard polisher like the DW849 or a D/A polisher...

I appreciate the help, and hopefully I will be posting some pics soon of one sweet detailing job!

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If the paint is oxidized or scratched, you will want a high speed buffer, (be sure it is a variable speed).

But if you are just looking for a good solid polish/ wax job, the orbital is the way to go.

If you use compound with the orbital, you will play hell getting a good shine back without a high speed.

Especially on black.

Black is a hard color to buff w/o leaving swirl marks.

Do some research and practice before you attempt to do a black vehicle for a customer. :evilgrin

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So if I understand you correctly, the D/A is good for finish work, but the high speed is good all around?

Yes.

My orbital is a heavy duty deal, it weighs about 15 or 20lbs.

and has a 10in pad.

It works great for detailing a clean car, but when you get into wet sanding and compounding you will definatly need a good high speed to get the job done right.

I've done detailing for 15+ years and I couldn't have done it right w/o a high speed and 2000 grit sand paper.

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Guest TravisT

So I guess my first "real" tool purchase for detailing will be a DW849. Thanks for the advice, once I get it I'm sure I will be back here with more questions!

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Guest Quick n' Clean

Hello,

I strongly suggest the Cyclo, which is a dual head buffer with rotation and oscilation which in essence makes it virtually impossible to burn through paint. I purchased mine through Rightlook.com and also completed training there. They have great stuff and the buffer is priceless. Good luck to you..

Hi,

I am new to the forums, and have been poking around on here for the past week or so. I am very interested in learning more about being a good detailer - mainly for my own vehicles. I am in the USAF and don't have too much time for side jobs, but an occasional one here and there may be in my future.

My main question right now is what would be a good polisher to start off with? I thought about just getting the infamous DW849, since every body shop I have been to seems to have this polisher in use. At the same time, I know that in the wrong hands, this can do serious paint damage. I currently have an el-cheapo craftsman orbital buffer that I have been using for many years, but I just don't think it is going to turn out a GOOD detailing job (or at least I haven't been lucky enough with it). I have also considered the PC DA polisher.

The main project I need to do is to buff many light scratches and swirl marks out of my black 2004 GMC Sierra. I definately don't want to risk damaging the paint, but I know the only way to get a good deep gloss is to machine polish it, followed by a glaze and then a quality wax. I also have a 90 mustang (silver) that I intended to use as a test vehicle - I am not nearly as concerned about the paint job on this vehicle - it's in pretty bad shape and in the next couple of years will see a paint job anyway. I also want to make sure whatever polisher I get will last and be able to be used for my future polish/wax jobs. Can anyone make a good recommendation for a rookie detailer? Thanks,

TravisT

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Guest kajunman
Hi,

I am new to the forums, and have been poking around on here for the past week or so. I am very interested in learning more about being a good detailer - mainly for my own vehicles. I am in the USAF and don't have too much time for side jobs, but an occasional one here and there may be in my future.

My main question right now is what would be a good polisher to start off with? I thought about just getting the infamous DW849, since every body shop I have been to seems to have this polisher in use. At the same time, I know that in the wrong hands, this can do serious paint damage. I currently have an el-cheapo craftsman orbital buffer that I have been using for many years, but I just don't think it is going to turn out a GOOD detailing job (or at least I haven't been lucky enough with it). I have also considered the PC DA polisher.

The main project I need to do is to buff many light scratches and swirl marks out of my black 2004 GMC Sierra. I definately don't want to risk damaging the paint, but I know the only way to get a good deep gloss is to machine polish it, followed by a glaze and then a quality wax. I also have a 90 mustang (silver) that I intended to use as a test vehicle - I am not nearly as concerned about the paint job on this vehicle - it's in pretty bad shape and in the next couple of years will see a paint job anyway. I also want to make sure whatever polisher I get will last and be able to be used for my future polish/wax jobs. Can anyone make a good recommendation for a rookie detailer? Thanks,

TravisT

The Porter Cable 7424 is pretty much the standard of thr industry for ease of use. As for as pads look at the Edge Pads. They are always centered and double sided. Giving Lake Country pads a run for their money.

Hi,

I am new to the forums, and have been poking around on here for the past week or so. I am very interested in learning more about being a good detailer - mainly for my own vehicles. I am in the USAF and don't have too much time for side jobs, but an occasional one here and there may be in my future.

My main question right now is what would be a good polisher to start off with? I thought about just getting the infamous DW849, since every body shop I have been to seems to have this polisher in use. At the same time, I know that in the wrong hands, this can do serious paint damage. I currently have an el-cheapo craftsman orbital buffer that I have been using for many years, but I just don't think it is going to turn out a GOOD detailing job (or at least I haven't been lucky enough with it). I have also considered the PC DA polisher.

The main project I need to do is to buff many light scratches and swirl marks out of my black 2004 GMC Sierra. I definately don't want to risk damaging the paint, but I know the only way to get a good deep gloss is to machine polish it, followed by a glaze and then a quality wax. I also have a 90 mustang (silver) that I intended to use as a test vehicle - I am not nearly as concerned about the paint job on this vehicle - it's in pretty bad shape and in the next couple of years will see a paint job anyway. I also want to make sure whatever polisher I get will last and be able to be used for my future polish/wax jobs. Can anyone make a good recommendation for a rookie detailer? Thanks,

TravisT

The Porter Cable 7424 is pretty much the standard of the industry for ease of use. As for as pads look at the Edge Pads. They are always centered and double sided. Giving Lake Country pads a run for their money.

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