Jump to content

Anybody read this?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 20
  • Created
  • Last Reply

here is the cut and paste of the article.

Clear as mud

By Fred Brown

Transparency in government is a good thing. The public needs to know what's going on in the places where laws are made and administered.

Transparency is also a very good thing for car windows. Colorado even has a law about that.

It limits how dark a car's windows can be. It was passed in 1994, as part of a comprehensive rewriting of motor vehicle laws.

But it doesn't seem to be either widely obeyed or rigidly enforced. And trying to get official figures is difficult at best. There's not a lot of government transparency about the window transparency law.

The law took effect Jan. 1, 1995. (No, they didn't call it Windows 95.) Since then, as far as I can determine after occasional but numerous phone calls, only a few thousand tickets have been issued.

But anyone who drives can see that there are more than a few thousand vehicles on the roads with windows dark enough to stifle a laser beam.

Most states have laws regulating tint on car windows. Colorado's is one of the more lenient. Even in California, the home of cool, front side windows have to allow 70 percent of the light through. In Colorado, it's more complicated, but essentially side windows must allow at least 27 percent "light transmittance."

Other windows, the ones "to the rear of the driver, including the rear window," can be even darker. That makes it less disruptive, for instance, to drive a hearse with a body in the back.

But if those rear windows are darker, then the front side windows revert to the same transparency rule as the windshield - 70 percent.

This feature, usually installed as an after-factory accessory, is also called "limo tint," because it's popular for people who don't want to be recognized, including teenagers going to proms.

And yet, the roads are full of cars with windows that seem to be a lot darker than the law allows. I've seen side windows that would allow the driver to safely watch a solar eclipse from the convenience of his automobile. The law makes no exception for mobile astronomical observatories, however.

If 27 percent "light transmittance" is OK, that apparently means the side windows can be 73 percent opaque. That's awfully dark. But, still, shouldn't you be able to see if there's someone in the car?

After all, that's the whole the point of the law. "It's definitely an officer safety issue," says State Patrol Capt. Jim Wolfinbarger.

Law enforcement lobbyists argued for the restriction when the bill was making its way through the legislature. They said that, when they walk up to a car they've stopped, they need to know what's going on inside. The driver could be pulling out a gun. A passenger could be scrambling to hide something.

I vaguely recall legislative arguments against the law because window tinting is a cultural thing. Members of some groups, it was said, like blackened windows because - well, I don't exactly remember the logic of it.

It may have been a semi-circular argument having something to do with wanting a little privacy so the police wouldn't always be hassling you. This law, of course, would only give the cops another excuse for hassling.

But the cultural-tradition defense doesn't have much backup. Blacked-out windows show up everywhere, and the drivers - sometimes you can see them head-on through the windshield if the sun is shining directly on them and they're wearing day-glo caps - come in all races, colors and ethnicities.

If there's any common characteristic, it's young maleness.

Furthermore, there doesn't seem to be much hassling going on. If people were being hassled, you'd think there would be more prosecutions under this law.

Denver Police say they've issued 2,800 tickets for too-dark windows during the past three years, including more than 1,000 in the first 11 months of 2003.

The State Patrol hasn't been able to supply any statistics. Several requests for hard numbers seem have gone unanswered. Wolfinbarger says he has issued more than a few tickets himself, but typically it's "only the most egregious offenders."

The law also makes it a crime to sell or install a window tint that's too dark. There's a fine of $500 to $5,000 for each offense.

But the Denver City Attorney's office didn't have any numbers on prosecutions, and neither did the county court or the traffic enforcement division. It took a half-dozen calls, two laps through the system, to not find that out.

Maybe it's just because it's December, and it's naturally dark anyway. But it certainly seems that more is being kept in the dark than just the drivers of mean-looking cars.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Colorado's two laws give the consumer a choice, 1) dark as you want on the back, but the d/p window must have nothing or, 2) 27% on all glass except the windshield (windscreen).

One or the other, but not both. :rollin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know I actualy Like that Makes more sence to tint it all in 27 then just the back in 5 The one with 27 will be cooler then just the backs in 5

Wish we had that law would be alot nicer to do more cars

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Litespeeds

Stupid law. They should just outlaw 5% so officers can see into the vehicles and allow up to 30% on the front doors.

What if an officer came up to a car that had 5% on the rears and nothing on the front. There could be somebody in the back seat pulling a gun on him/her and they wouldn't even know it. All they can see is the driver. :evileye

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What if an officer came up to a car that had 5% on the rears and nothing on the front.? There could be somebody in the back seat pulling a gun on him/her and they wouldn't even know it.? All they can see is the driver.?  :passout

Anyone with the character to pull a gun on a cop is going to do it tinted windows or not...

Two of my brothers are cops and they dislike the use of dark film, too. However, they have also said, "Any cop that is dumb enough to walk up on dark tinted vehicle (especially at night) deserves whatever he receives". Precautionary measure is to bull horn them out of the car and if they do not budge, call in back up.

Colorado's law is the most fair in the nation, it gives you more than one choice.

I like New Hampshire's seat belt law as well; Under 18 must wear and over 18 is a matter of choice.

That is how I teach, too, by giving choices, not dictating one specific rule of thumb or method.

It's all about choice... :passout

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest tmaster

don't get me going on tint laws. :lol look at MI law it sucks. I have worked on changing this the last 7 years. police say it's just a reason to pull you over to check you out more thoroughly. :lol about 5 years ago a full panel van was stoped near here, state police found 5 guys with wepons for a small army. no one shot :lol no tinted windows :passout whats the relation :passout

oh, if it was up to the state police, all cars would be made of glass. :lol

and another thing, when my shop gets too buisy I call my friend to help (has been tinting for 8 yrs.) HE'S A COP! and that is the truth! :booga

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any cop that is dumb enough to walk up on dark tinted vehicle (especially at night) deserves whatever he receives".   

I see cops takeing stupid chances everyday,one of them is have you ever seen 1 cop searching a car with 3-4 suspects standing by,if you feel the need to seach a car then you should feel the need for backup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


  •   Sponsored by
    filmvinyldesigns

    The Tint Tutor

    ride wrap

    Lexen

    Tint My Ride

    tintwiz

    signwarehouse

    martinmetalwork.com

    rewiredtech.io

    tinttek

  • Activity Stream

    1. 2

      Question about home mirrored window tint

    2. 2

      Question about home mirrored window tint

    3. 2

      Question about home mirrored window tint

    4. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

    5. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

    6. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

    7. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

    8. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

    9. 13

      Smallish bubbles 1.5 days after install; normal or cause for concern?

×
×
  • Create New...