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BondKap passed cyclic and impact test


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I was asked about testing many times so I had independent testing done at ATL, Tampa.

I used an 8 mil window film on a standard 3' patio door. BondKap BK 2003 on the sides and BK 2002 on the top/bottom attached using Dow 995. I was not testing film but seeing a 2x4 shot out of an air cannon was pretty cool.

After the glass finally cracked the cyclic test began and stretched that film and tempered glass fragment in and out 9000 times. It was also a site to see for the first 10 minutes. The test takes 6 hours. I did NOT sit there for the whole show!

So now it can be said with confidence Dow 995 holds very well. BondKap will not chafe or cut into the film during cycling. The combination is a great choice for someone looking for an aesthetic attachment system.

I did post the test report and video on BondKap.com and YouTube

Thanks for your time :lol

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Guest VOLTRON

I have used bondkap twice and didnt like it at all. Seems like it is for people who dont know how to wetglaze. It was very messy and the cap wouldnt stay inplace, it kept coming off. I would rather wetglaze then use this stuff and I hate wetglazing.

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I have used bondkap twice and didnt like it at all. Seems like it is for people who dont know how to wetglaze. It was very messy and the cap wouldnt stay inplace, it kept coming off. I would rather wetglaze then use this stuff and I hate wetglazing.

I'm sorry you feel this way. I was not aware of any difficulties from any of the 17 companies who have purchased BondKap in Texas. From the feedback I have received they said it went well. As with anyone who tries a new product there is a learning curve.

If the tip is cut correctly and you apply an adequate bead the BondKap will sit right in place. Not enough silicone and the BondKap will move because there is not enough silicone under it to support the shape and therefore not enough silicone to be an effective anchor.

If too much silicone is applied, yes it can be messy. After two jobs I’m surprised you are still having issues.

If you call or email I would be happy to help. There are installation videos on the website as well.

By the way it absolutley is the most effective way to anchor an entry door and not worry about people sticking their fingers in silicone.

:lol2

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Guest VOLTRON

Actually the most effective way to do an entry door is to pull the frame caps off the door and film to the edge of the glass, then apply silicone and put caps back on. When done this way it looks like an untinted door and there is no worry of people putting there fingers in it cause it is inside. Also, when done this way it makes working the glass out of the door frame ALOT more difficult then when done outside of the caps and bondkap applied to the frames. When done on inside of the caps, the film and caps are bonded to the door frame making it alot more difficult to kick the glass out of the frame as opposed to outside of the caps, where you can more easily knock the glass out because the caps are not bonded to the glass and frame.

Also, I do realize there is a learning curve and I know it would get easier with more experience, and it has a bit of a better look then wetglaze but when wetglazing is done properly it can look just as good. I am not trying to knock your product, I thought it would be alot easier then what my experience was. It is less involved then wetglaze that you dont have to tape off the frames and glass but I dont know that it is anymore superior then just wetglaze.

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Actually the most effective way to do an entry door is to pull the frame caps off the door and film to the edge of the glass, then apply silicone and put caps back on. When done this way it looks like an untinted door and there is no worry of people putting there fingers in it cause it is inside. Also, when done this way it makes working the glass out of the door frame ALOT more difficult then when done outside of the caps and bondkap applied to the frames. When done on inside of the caps, the film and caps are bonded to the door frame making it alot more difficult to kick the glass out of the frame as opposed to outside of the caps, where you can more easily knock the glass out because the caps are not bonded to the glass and frame.

Also, I do realize there is a learning curve and I know it would get easier with more experience, and it has a bit of a better look then wetglaze but when wetglazing is done properly it can look just as good. I am not trying to knock your product, I thought it would be alot easier then what my experience was. It is less involved then wetglaze that you dont have to tape off the frames and glass but I dont know that it is anymore superior then just wetglaze.

BondKap is not superior to wetglaze. It is just another way to apply it a bit more consistently. There are guys out there who can apply silicone very well and do not need BondKap. I have been running silicone for 29 years (I hate to even admit that) I'm not being full of myself but I'm very good at it. Fortunately for me (and my business) there are people out there who are good at other things but not running silicone, BondKap can be a great help to those people.

As far as the entry doors, have you ever had to replace a broken filmed door glass after it had been siliconed behind the stops? Unfortunately I have! It is impossible to get the stops off in one piece and usually requires replacing the the entire door assembly. If you are lucky you can replace just the stops. I did do some testing before coming up with this method for the doors. Yes, you can kick the glass enough where it will pull a portion of the stop but the glass never came completely out. I actually made a good size hole in the glass/film enough to crawl through before the stops and glass ever fell out.

By the way thanks for the input I really like to hear what people think of BondKap. I am always looking to improve it somehow or even come up with something better.

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Well I hate to do the wetglaze, hell I would rather do FrameGard then do wetglaze and the Bondkap does seem to be an easier method I just havent mastered it yet, hell I dont feel I have masterd wetglaze some days lol. I have been tinting more years then I have been wetglazing and am better at tinting then the wetglaze but I still feel I do a very good job at it compared to some installations I have seen. The Bondkap seems to be a less problematic installation then wetglaze I guess I just need some more time at it. I didnt have the corner cap cutouts to get the corners to sit right so that may have been alot of the problem I ran into. Also though, I was doing the installations on convienient stores and they were very busy and the whole job itself was a hugantic nightmare and I was frustrated the whole time with customers in the way and asking if I could spare some change all day. Again I am not knocking the system just telling my experience with it, didnt mean to come off as an a55 about it.

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