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46 hudson headliner


Guest davidh

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Guest davidh

my son removed the old headliner in our 46 hudson a few years ago, and we bought a headliner from a place on the west coast. now its time to put it all back together. I have re-made the windlace that is sewn to a board strip, and punched the slots etc in the board, and marked the metal bows or course so they are ready to insert in the new material. problem is in my mind, I cannot vision how the sides of the headliner are fastened in and how the windlace strips are attached................. I;ve searched the hudson forum, and there is nothning listed. most of these guys just bring their car to the upholesterer and back in with a bunch of cash.

I know that headliners are not easy but can anyone herre help with diagram or photos of what I am either missing or how all this goes together to make a nice finished and tight edge ?

davidh (the old guy with the new stapler that uses 1/8" staples)

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They're not too difficult, but it will require some cutting and gluing.

Never done a Hudson, would love to though.

With some vehicles it is better to remove the front and rear glass to be able to pull and glue the ends to the pinchwelds.

You will have to cut the listings one the sides to get the stretch you'll need.

If in doubt, take it to a local trim shop....

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Guest davidh
They're not too difficult, but it will require some cutting and gluing.

Never done a Hudson, would love to though.

With some vehicles it is better to remove the front and rear glass to be able to pull and glue the ends to the pinchwelds.

You will have to cut the listings one the sides to get the stretch you'll need.

If in doubt, take it to a local trim shop....

the glass is out as we have done a NEAR frame off restoration. seats are next project and they are already out. I understand the dront to rear stretch but its the sides, and the finishing of them that im not understanding.

if I just stretch side to side and glue to the top channel above the doors, I can;t visuialize how to attach the windlace and strip of black board that its sewn to that matches the curvature of the lines of the tio of the doors and goes from the front of the car all the way cback to the end of the rear quarter window.

we have no shops around here that deal with old cars. they mainly do panels and seats.

welcome to rural northern wisconsin.

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Guest davidh

spelling corrections

the glass is out as we have done a NEAR frame off restoration. seats are next project and they are already out. I understand the front to rear stretch but its the sides, and the finishing of them that im not understanding.

if I just stretch side to side and glue to the top channel above the doors, I can;t visuialize how to attach the windlace and strip of black board that its sewn to that matches the curvature of the lines of the top of the doors and goes from the front of the car all the way back to the end of the rear quarter window.

we have no shops around here that deal with old cars. they mainly do panels and seats.

welcome to rural northern wisconsin.

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Some photos would help, in my experience, the windlace usually tucks and or glues in place....

If you can send some detailed photos, I will try to help...

I am a bit far from Wis. but I do know it's difficult to find someone with the proper experience with these older cars almost anywhere....

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Guest davidh
Some photos would help, in my experience, the windlace usually tucks and or glues in place....

If you can send some detailed photos, I will try to help...

I am a bit far from Wis. but I do know it's difficult to find someone with the proper experience with these older cars almost anywhere....

thanks, I will take a bunch of pix today. geeesh, a nice summer trip from the heat to this area in july. always cooler near the "big" lake (superior)

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Some photos would help, in my experience, the windlace usually tucks and or glues in place....

If you can send some detailed photos, I will try to help...

I am a bit far from Wis. but I do know it's difficult to find someone with the proper experience with these older cars almost anywhere....

thanks, I will take a bunch of pix today. geeesh, a nice summer trip from the heat to this area in july. always cooler near the "big" lake (superior)

haha, I hear ya, our July's and especially August are very hot and humid here...

PS, your linky to photobucket no worky..... :coffee

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Guest sewing_guy

I've had the opportunity of working on a couple different Hudson headliners. One was a 49 Commodore walkthrough. By this time, the headliners used the gripper strips found on most other domestic cars of the time. Usually, the gripper strips mounted over the doors (front and rear if a 4-door), and on 2-doors, stapled along the rear side window frames. The windlace was attached to the car prior to the gripper strip being mounted (originally, most cars had a strip of cardboard sewn to the windlace that hooked up in the tabs over the doors. Usually, restorers fill the void with hard tacking material and simply staple the windlace in place).

On an earlier Hudson... a 1936 Terraplane pickup, one of 8 built... it was a whole different story on the sides. The pickup was basically a cutdown terraplane sedan. I made the new headliner, windlace and side trim, but did not do the install. Instead, it was sent back to the restorer for installation. I actually don't think it has been done yet as the owner got a wild hair and decided to pull the truck from the shop after several years and almost being finished. He is going to "finish it myself" and stuck it in his garage. Anyway, from what I gathered, the windlace was mounted to the body of the vehicle along the openings, the bows were hung, and the sides of the headliner were just pushed up into the void on the sides. When the pieces came in, there was no type of gripper strip or mounting surface. According to the builder it was held up by pressure alone. Having never seen the truck, I am thinking it was stapled along the sides and then side trim pieces were installed to hide the edge. This is how Cadillac installed their headliners even through the 1950s. the headliner is pulled tight from side to side and stapled into side tacking areas. Then the big chrome trim is screwed up over the edges hiding the staples.

Keep in mind that a lot of installation methods were simply because of speed and ease on the assembly line. If you can find another way to install it, do so. Most vehicles are going after a "museum restoration" that looks correct to the naked eye, but may be built differently inside. Very few put the hundreds of thousands into a Concourse d'Elegance level of restoration that is correct from the inside out even if a better way exists. That being said, you might consider visiting a salvage yard and look for some early 70s vehicles or others with bow-type headliners. Rip them down and unscrew several pieces of the gripper strips on the sides. Then you can cut and fashion those to the sides of your Hudson to create more of a conventional method of installing the headliner.

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