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Security Film on Vans


Guest dagz

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I've been asked about security film for vans. I used to do a fair bit of it, but not done it for years.

You can't put it on rear screens can you? I guess it would be impossible on any rear screen with a decent curve. But if you did manage to get it on there, it's pretty useless on bonded windows anyway right?

If someone does ask you about security for van rear screens, what do you tell them?

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Tinted many windows for movie sets. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre that was made a few years back has my fingerprints all over it. The squad car 8 mil and van had 4 mil installed. I did a ton of the windshields with 8 mil. Piece of cake.

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Guest tintjam65
I've been asked about security film for vans. I used to do a fair bit of it, but not done it for years.

You can't put it on rear screens can you? I guess it would be impossible on any rear screen with a decent curve. But if you did manage to get it on there, it's pretty useless on bonded windows anyway right?

If someone does ask you about security for van rear screens, what do you tell them?

Windows other than roll down type are best secured with safety film by removing internal body trim, adding film to reach behind the trim and then film edge is secured to sides with a structural sealant and trim replaced. This does not always work for every situation, but for the most part it's all that can be done.

Heat forming safety film is a whole different art than regular car tint. 4-mil isn't so bad and can be done on many moderate to semi-difficult curvatures. 8-mil is more limited yet is known to be successfully heat formed to moderately difficult curvatures, which are found in vans, suvs and some 2- or 4-door passenger vehicles.

It is best to wet shrink safety film no matter the thickness and with thicker like 8-mil, you need shrink a little in one area, move to work another area and so on. It is not best to continually heat the film and expect ease of shrink with safety film like regular auto tint; Constant bombardment of heat keeps these thicker films expanding and expanding (to the point of cinch or melt), without having the time to cool down where shrinking truly takes place.

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Guest sound&security
I've been asked about security film for vans. I used to do a fair bit of it, but not done it for years.

You can't put it on rear screens can you? I guess it would be impossible on any rear screen with a decent curve. But if you did manage to get it on there, it's pretty useless on bonded windows anyway right?

If someone does ask you about security for van rear screens, what do you tell them?

Windows other than roll down type are best secured with safety film by removing internal body trim, adding film to reach behind the trim and then film edge is secured to sides with a structural sealant and trim replaced. This does not always work for every situation, but for the most part it's all that can be done.

Heat forming safety film is a whole different art than regular car tint. 4-mil isn't so bad and can be done on many moderate to semi-difficult curvatures. 8-mil is more limited yet is known to be successfully heat formed to moderately difficult curvatures, which are found in vans, suvs and some 2- or 4-door passenger vehicles.

It is best to wet shrink safety film no matter the thickness and with thicker like 8-mil, you need shrink a little in one area, move to work another area and so on. It is not best to continually heat the film and expect ease of shrink with safety film like regular auto tint; Constant bombardment of heat keeps these thicker films expanding and expanding (to the point of cinch or melt), without having the time to cool down where shrinking truly takes place.

LLUMAR offers a 4 mil security auto film- in clear and 30% check it out.

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