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What is the best way to hand cut a back glass with no black border??


Blackdout

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I tried tinting the back window of an old pickup and it didn't have any black border. Every time I try to cut the film by tracing the rubber on the outside, I would still end up with small gaps in certain areas. What is the best way to get a perfect cut for these types of windows?

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really depends on the particular truck.  Some have a really nice and open rubber inside, others are really tight.  Some you can trim the inside a little bit to make it open more.

 

If you have any extra room inside then cut the film bottom but not quite all the way to the edges.  Mark the rest of the way to the edge.  Drop the film down a 1/4" or so and then cut the top and sides but once again do not cut all the way to the bottom corners.  Finish the cut on by moving the film around or to a cutting glass....

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Use a liner. Lay it on the outside cut it out. Then lay the liner on top of the film and cut slightly larger. They are a bit of a pain and may take a few tries.

X2, instead of a liner I use freezer paper. It's plastic coated on one side, cut it roughly larger than the window, spray the window a little, lay it on and smooth it out. Crease the sides in and draw the edge with a pencil. Use that pattern to cut your film slightly larger than the outline.

Trim just enough rubber from the inside to accommodate the film and apply.

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I leave just a tiny bit of extra film across the bottom. Maybe 1/8 inch at most, cut around the sides and top except for the very bottom corners. Then shift the film slightly to give just an extra bit on the bottom corners. This works well on newer gasket set windows.

However if the are old and dirty, your best bet is to pull the window to tint it.

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c2c is right, if its an older pickup with tight gaskets or not much of a border make sure you clean the edges very well.

 

if its a rubber gasket on the inside and you cut a very small "V" pattern out of the inside edge of the rubber just barely big enough for the tint to overlap. this is easier said than done. you have to be very very neat and careful about this way.

 

I did a f250 that sounded like this and on the back window I did what ryker was saying. cut part of the film but not too far into the corners and just slide the tint around doing this and being careful on each side.....It worked great for me on a huge f250 backglass on the first try.  it turned out great and needed no trimming on the inside

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really depends on the particular truck. Some have a really nice and open rubber inside, others are really tight. Some you can trim the inside a little bit to make it open more.

If you have any extra room inside then cut the film bottom but not quite all the way to the edges. Mark the rest of the way to the edge. Drop the film down a 1/4" or so and then cut the top and sides but once again do not cut all the way to the bottom corners. Finish the cut on by moving the film around or to a cutting glass....

:bingo

I leave just a tiny bit of extra film across the bottom. Maybe 1/8 inch at most, cut around the sides and top except for the very bottom corners. Then shift the film slightly to give just an extra bit on the bottom corners. This works well on newer gasket set windows.

However if the are old and dirty, your best bet is to pull the window to tint it.

:bingo
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:yeah  :yeah  :yeah :yeah  :yeah 

 

My 69 Dodge van was a challenge.

Used freezer paper, did some guttering on the inside, extensive cleaning.

 

Found it most helpful to test fit paper template on the inside to get it right - then cut and test fit the film on the inside. 

 

Several failures along the way   :lol6

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