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Ceramic Heat Rejection


Guest mtech8

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Hi. So I'm looking at buying Tint for my car.

 

I was drawn into using ceramic (Huper Optik) due to all the rave of the heat rejection. However, trying out the Huper tint vs a non ceramic (made by Winco), I've noticed that I still feel more of the heat from the heat lamp than I do from the Huper! When I asked about this, I was told that this was do to ceramic reflecting more of the heat while non ceramic absorbs the heat. That the long term effect is that the tint will provide more heat rejection/cooling.

 

Is this right? In terms of car applications, wouldn't non ceramic be a better choice in terms of driving comfort as when driving, AC is on and you feel less heat that hits you. But with ceramic tint, it only provides cooler when you get back into your car in a hot day, but overall when your driving, the heat will affect you more?

 

Any thoughts?

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I would simply say that the Huper Ceramic is filtering more energy than the other... it could either be through reflection or absorption because it does both.

 

I can tell you this from experience. I have two cars, one has Huper Ceramic 50 and the other has a reliable well-know brand of 30% vlt metalized film. Although the Huper is considerably lighter in VLT, it feels way more comfortable to sit behind especially when direct sun hits my face. A couple of things are happening here.

 

  1. The Huper is filtering some IR wavelengths that normally would pass through and be absorbed by the occupant and as it is re-radiated at a longer wavelength it is felt as heat
  2. The TSER on the Ceramic 50 is higher than the TSER on the 30% metalized 

Your results on a heat lamp will be even more pronounced if it is an IR bulb because 90%+ of that energy is IR rather than visible so when practical it is best to either test on glass with natural sunlight or use a halogen bulb on that lamp. Either way, the Huper Ceramic will probably feel better than the Wincos for the 2 reasons I stated. :twocents

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Compare the TSER (total solar energy rejected), that is the truth in how well a film performs. All this mumbo jumbo about ceramic blocks more heat is used on an unwitting public who only hears half the story. Visible light makes up 49%+, near infrared 48%+ and ultraviolet light makes up less than 2%.

 

The sun's energy, visible light, (near) infrared light and violet light all produces or converts to heat (far infrared) once it strikes a surface. Far infrared is the only 'heat' in wavelengths farther out on the electromagnetic range than those dealt with by window films.

 

So, the more visible light, near infrared light and ultraviolet light a film blocks = less total solar energy striking a surface, thereby the less heat is produced or sensed in the case of us humans.

 

Water is a strong absorber of near infrared, so the more of it that doesn't get to the skin and the (watery) tissue below it, the less sensation of your tissue heating up. 

 

Compare the TSER of each film and decide for performance then consider how they will look, second.

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Compare the TSER (total solar energy rejected), that is the truth in how well a film performs. All this mumbo jumbo about ceramic blocks more heat is used on an unwitting public who only hears half the story. Visible light makes up 49%+, near infrared 48%+ and ultraviolet light makes up less than 2%.

 

The sun's energy, visible light, (near) infrared light and violet light all produces or converts to heat (far infrared) once it strikes a surface. Far infrared is the only 'heat' in wavelengths farther out on the electromagnetic range than those dealt with by window films.

 

So, the more visible light, near infrared light and ultraviolet light a film blocks = less total solar energy striking a surface, thereby the less heat is produced or sensed in the case of us humans.

 

Water is a strong absorber of near infrared, so the more of it that doesn't get to the skin and the (watery) tissue below it, the less sensation of your tissue heating up. 

 

Compare the TSER of each film and decide for performance then consider how they will look, second.

Ceramic mumbo jumbo is thing of the past. Thanks Smartie

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Compare the TSER (total solar energy rejected), that is the truth in how well a film performs. All this mumbo jumbo about ceramic blocks more heat is used on an unwitting public who only hears half the story. Visible light makes up 49%+, near infrared 48%+ and ultraviolet light makes up less than 2%.

The sun's energy, visible light, (near) infrared light and violet light all produces or converts to heat (far infrared) once it strikes a surface. Far infrared is the only 'heat' in wavelengths farther out on the electromagnetic range than those dealt with by window films.

So, the more visible light, near infrared light and ultraviolet light a film blocks = less total solar energy striking a surface, thereby the less heat is produced or sensed in the case of us humans.

Water is a strong absorber of near infrared, so the more of it that doesn't get to the skin and the (watery) tissue below it, the less sensation of your tissue heating up.

Compare the TSER of each film and decide for performance then consider how they will look, second.

I can think of a few films from un-named manufacturer that contradict this entirely. I do agree that TSER is the be all and end all of measuring how well a film performs against, well, total solar energy. But I've seen films that claim 50% TSER and you might as well be staring directly into the sun at midday.

I know you know your shiz Smartie, so I'm always very selective about what I put forward, but my own industry experience tells me that TSER is not much more than a universally standardised testing measure. Kind of like a Grade Point Average or an IQ test.

Much Respect. [emoji106]

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am not sure if this video will help anybody but I made it a while back.  It might just help professionals think outside the box when communicating with their customers. I have learned a lot more about this topic since I made this video and will remake it soon.  I hope this helps!  http://youtu.be/P_4jMVS8C5A?list=UUdlsBvAHtvwzAJdwjYMRwHw

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