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Film on a white Porsche GT4


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Hi guys. Im getting a new white Porsxhe GT4 and I was thinking about wrapping the nose. I've always had a clear bra on my car but I've never had a white car before... It will be garaged kept but driven 8,000 miles per year, washed and waxed regularly. This is a bright non metallic white. Even with the "warranty" it seems like yellowing is a given with every material on a white car. Is it a mistake to wrap a white car?

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Films of yesterday or of lower quality would stain more frequently.  If proper care wasn't taken then the films top coat would be eventually broken down exposing the films pores.  In turn, these pores would fill up with contaminates from all kinds of things causing a yellowing or discoloration effect.  Chemicals found in automatic car washes, certain waxes and cleaners, exhaust smog, etc...would all contribute to this.  On white cars this was more noticeable.

 

The available films today (but not all films so be careful) aren't as problematic and are more durable.  They rejuvenate or self-heal as we call it, which not only heals scratches away but also brings any dirt to the surface allowing the consumer to clean the film more easily during normal washing.  This happens from the polymers within the film moving around, twisting, turning, raising to the surface bringing the contaminates with it.  Self-leveling also occurs which will level out scratches to a point.  This also allows for lower surface energy so things will not stick to the film as easily making cleanup and maintenance a lot more friendlier.  Newer films can also withstand the automatic car washes.  I've been told that the XPEL Ultimate brand can be cleaned with lacquer thinner, withstand break fluid, etc.  XPEL Ultimate has an automotive grade clear coat on the top layer (I'm not sure about other brands).  Durability and good resistance to everyday elements are nicely rejected because of this.

Combining all of these properties has really accelerated the PPF industry forward bringing positive attitudes to not only the consumers, but also to the installers.  As installers I do not have to educate my customers as much on a care and maintenance perspective.  And as a customer, you have less to worry about which makes your money spent even more of a better investment.

 

Some of the few things to be aware of....stay away from waxes or cleaners that contain petroleum distillates (should tell you this; "Contains Petroleum Distillates", on back of wax bottle).  Petroleum Distillates will break down polyurethane products over time, and since PPF is a polyurethane product stay away from this.

Also anything that contains gasoline or kerosene (again a type of petroleum)....keep these off of the film, along with other harsh chemicals... 

Keep the vehicle washed without major neglect, and do not let bird droppings sit for a long period of time on the film.

On a Porsche GT4 I'm sure your not going to clean with kerosene / etc... but just pointing out the important stuff here.

 

 

I'm sure other's will chime in bringing there advice and experience to add to this.  Maybe a few of the manufacturer employees who are on this forum can say a thing or two as well.

 

Check with the film manufacturers by contacting them and ask these questions for peace of mind.  Hearing directly from the source is always great confirmation to solidify your understanding.

 

If I missed anything, or am incorrect on any of these points...go ahead and correct me guys !!!!!   Hope everyone had a good holiday!!!!

 

~A

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First, of course you should protect a white car. Every color of car gets chipped and scratched. I have done probably hundreds of white cars.

 

Second, the degree that modern films yellow is minor compared to old 3M scotchgard and Ventureshield.

 

Third, all film brands will yellow. If someone tells you otherwise, they are blind.

 

Fourth, proper maintenance and storing the car indoors as often as possible. Will prolong the life of the film.

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Firstly, I like to state that I have ZERO experience with PPF. However, I do know enough about car protection to try and answer your question: "Is it a mistake to wrap a white car?" with some accuracy. 

 

Anything you put on your car is better than nothing. Wax for example, though very weak compared to the new products on the market such as: sealants/coatings/PPF's, will provide some level of protection. But its a no brainer to go with the ladder since its available for you to buy. Your oem clear coat will start to fade and yellow on its own since there is no sacrificial layer to absorb UVs once its out in the sun. So its best to put something on it when its new to keep the car bright white. 

 

Here are your options for what you can do with your white Porsche:

 

1. Coatings. 

Coatings are the new kids on the block. Its basically another layer of permanent of clear coat that is applied BY HAND. Its much stronger than oem clear coat. The best coating on the market has a hardness that is close to diamond strength.  You can get someone to do it for you professionally and will cost you around $1500(estimate)

 

2.Paint Protection Films(PPF)

As I stated, I have zero experience with PPF but these are my findings from a distance. 

Seeing reviews and reports of PPF's yellowing and lifting, I would go towards the direction of a coating. However, seeing some of the NEW PPF's to hit the market, im more inclined to go towards PPF's as my car protection of choice, though, you cant go wrong with the top of the line coating. 

 

There is a couple reasons for this and it applies to the new PPF's:

1. Self healing.

If you were to get a coat of the self healing mechanism sprayed on your car, that alone would cost you around $2000. These ppfs comes with it brah. Talk about a deal right? Instead of making the clear coat rock hard, they made it super soft. Its an extremely cool and unique feature. Especially for black cars where you can see small scratches very easily. 

2. Longer warranty. 

The best coating has a 5 year warranty. Some PPF's offer a five to seven year warranty. If it fades, yellows. Just sue em. Jk

 

Im not sure about the cost of PPF's but im guesstimating around 2k-3k for an entire vehicle. My advise is that if you'r going to do PPF, do the whole car. If its any more than 2-3k I would go with the coating. 

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From my experience talking to high-end detailers. 

 

Coatings provide no rock chip or scratch protection. They actually say if the coating gets scratched. It is quite difficult to fix. Cause it requires stripping the coating before doing paint correction.

 

Coatings only provide water beading, protection from stains, and ease of washing.

 

They are two separate products that aren't a one or the other.

 

This why it is becoming popular to put the coatings ontop of the film. Which will give you the benefits of both products.

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From my experience talking to high-end detailers. 

 

Coatings provide no rock chip or scratch protection. They actually say if the coating gets scratched. It is quite difficult to fix. Cause it requires stripping the coating before doing paint correction.

 

Coatings only provide water beading, protection from stains, and ease of washing.

 

They are two separate products that aren't a one or the other.

 

This why it is becoming popular to put the coatings ontop of the film. Which will give you the benefits of both products.

 

 Right now, there are a ton of coatings available on the market, just like there are PPF's. The mid end coatings which is made out of glass//quartz, will not be as durable to hold up against rock chips or heavy scratches as the coating is too thin and weak for that. They do hold up very well against light marring, say improper washing technique. It is still a significant level of protection. It is what it is and that is a very thin layer of glass. These coatings cost around $60-80 bucks so you can't coat a NASA spaceship with it and expect it to hold up re-entering earths atmosphere. 

 

As for the higher end coatings they do hold very well against strong scratches and it have been tested for. As for rock chips? The coating will most likely crack. Reason for that is because a diamond can withstand high tension but has poor impact resistance, like carbon fiber. 

 

Im glad you mentioned rock chips as its another major benefit of having a PPF. However, ppf may not be worth the extra 2-3k over coating and using my car as an example, it rarely ever gets hit by a pebble, and even if it did, im sure the coating would hold up some what. 

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