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Hello guys, 

 

I recently picked up a 2016 Golf R with 5 miles on it at pickup and the car was delivered to me right after it got off the truck. I had it tinted by a local shop. I am seeking advice because I believe my trim has been melted during the tinting process. After texting the owner the photos, he claims that this was done by the dealership and that he assures me he did not melt my trim. I am seeking the advice of professional window tinters on here, is there any way this could be a dealer cover up? The defect was covered up with a sharpie and you can tell that the trim near the mark has been flattened and lost some of its texture. Thanks for the help guys, just trying to figure out whats going on with my new car. 

 

Driv3r 

 

 

 

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IMO it was not caused by the tinter.  This is because 99.9% of time we use heat guns it is on the outside of the car...not inside.  We cut and shrink (when heat gun is used) on the outside of the windows to get the form.  Once we apply the film on the inside of the windows, we still heat up the outside of the glass if we need to heat the film more.  On top of that, I can't see a possible way someone would be able to place a heat gun in that position.  This is because it is not a flat piece, it curves inward which means the window would of been all the way down to access that section.  If the window was all the way down, there would not be anything to heat.  

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I have to agree. I'm not really sure why they would've had a heat gun inside for. That's not to say it hasn't been done. With the extent of that damage I would assume the tinter would've probably a noticed well before this that he was damaging the panel. All that being said maybe running by the place and let him take a look at it but more than likely I would say no.

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IMO it was not caused by the tinter.  This is because 99.9% of time we use heat guns it is on the outside of the car...not inside.  We cut and shrink (when heat gun is used) on the outside of the windows to get the form.  Once we apply the film on the inside of the windows, we still heat up the outside of the glass if we need to heat the film more.  On top of that, I can't see a possible way someone would be able to place a heat gun in that position.  This is because it is not a flat piece, it curves inward which means the window would of been all the way done to access that section.  If the window was all the way done, there would not be anything to heat.  

Thanks for your response DynamicAppearence, I appreciate the help. I did notice that the this installer does indeed do some heating with a heat gun from the inside of the window, but I certainly understand that the heat shrinking is done on the outside. I dont think a heat gun was resting on the position, I think excess heat and some type of tool use to place the tint down caused what appears to be flattened trim and a defect which is now covered up by sharpie. 

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IMO it was not caused by the tinter.  This is because 99.9% of time we use heat guns it is on the outside of the car...not inside.  We cut and shrink (when heat gun is used) on the outside of the windows to get the form.  Once we apply the film on the inside of the windows, we still heat up the outside of the glass if we need to heat the film more.  On top of that, I can't see a possible way someone would be able to place a heat gun in that position.  This is because it is not a flat piece, it curves inward which means the window would of been all the way done to access that section.  If the window was all the way done, there would not be anything to heat.  

Thanks for your response DynamicAppearence, I appreciate the help. I did notice that the this installer does indeed do some heating with a heat gun from the inside of the window, but I certainly understand that the heat shrinking is done on the outside. I dont think a heat gun was resting on the position, I think excess heat and some type of tool use to place the tint down caused what appears to be flattened trim and a defect which is now covered up by sharpie. 

 

 

Tool wise nothing should touch the door panel, only the glass and the inner part of the rubber seal.  Not too mention he would of have to let the heat gun stay on that section for a while for it to be hot enough to damage the panel even if a tool was drug along it.  Like I said, I don't see how it is physically possible.  The absolutely only question I have for the tinter is why did he not show you this when he first started that door.  As soon as I saw this type of damage on a new vehicle I would bring the owner back immediately to show it.

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IMO it was not caused by the tinter.  This is because 99.9% of time we use heat guns it is on the outside of the car...not inside.  We cut and shrink (when heat gun is used) on the outside of the windows to get the form.  Once we apply the film on the inside of the windows, we still heat up the outside of the glass if we need to heat the film more.  On top of that, I can't see a possible way someone would be able to place a heat gun in that position.  This is because it is not a flat piece, it curves inward which means the window would of been all the way done to access that section.  If the window was all the way done, there would not be anything to heat.  

Thanks for your response DynamicAppearence, I appreciate the help. I did notice that the this installer does indeed do some heating with a heat gun from the inside of the window, but I certainly understand that the heat shrinking is done on the outside. I dont think a heat gun was resting on the position, I think excess heat and some type of tool use to place the tint down caused what appears to be flattened trim and a defect which is now covered up by sharpie. 

 

 

Tool wise nothing should touch the door panel, only the glass and the inner part of the rubber seal.  Not too mention he would of have to let the heat gun stay on that section for a while for it to be hot enough to damage the panel even if a tool was drug along it.  Like I said, I don't see how it is physically possible.  The absolutely only question I have for the tinter is why did he not show you this when he first started that door.  As soon as I saw this type of damage on a new vehicle I would bring the owner back immediately to show it.

 

I am not sure why he did not show me the damage, he probably will claim he did not notice it, but i have not asked him. I am just trying to figure out what happened here, but the trim appears to have been heated up and flattened somehow, you can tell by the texture change in the photos.

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That's the only thing suspicious about it. I get a vehicle in that's brand new and notice that I'm calling or pulling them back there. Also if said tinter did use a gun on the inside for whatever reason it shouldn't have been long enough to create that burn.

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