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Dry Shrinking Questions


finishlineautosports

I have a couple questions pertaining to dry shrinking BG's that have been presenting an issue for me. I have been getting better at BG's in general but I find that either with the soap method, the tint will not want to glide for me and I usually end up with a crease somewhere if not more and then with the powder method, I go to wet-check it and I'll have very very very tiny creases in spots that I cannot smooth away on the ext. When I apply and squeegee, some disappear and some do not.

Just wondering if anyone has some insight as to what could be the cause of these issues?

And no, no pics since my screen on my camera is all messed up.

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what soap are you using? ( use a bar of ivory) . Are you letting the soap dry enough B4 attempting ? If done properly, no wet check stage is needed with soap method. :thumb

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from what ive gathered. soap/dryer sheet will give you some stick to the glass, especially when smoothing with a hard card. which is great because then you know that part of the tint is shrunk properly.

with powder, if you use too much the film wont stick at all and it becomes more of a guessing game if its shrunk, then a wet check, more shrinking............. but its awesome for letting the film float

1 tip with the bar soap. give it a few minutes then run some heat over it to double check its dry and to dry spots that may have been left with a little extra water before you put the film on for the shrink

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ya sounds like ur not letting the soap dry completely. i usually apply the soap to the BG then while its drying i will clean the inside of the glass and if i have to, remove the rear deck. by the time im done its completely dry and ready for the film

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With the soap method, I let it dry usually for about 10 minutes or so, but maybe I am applying too much? With the powder, I used to use a lot and now use much much less so it seems to help but when I am wet checking it, I usually have to just touch up a few spots with the heat. But the problem with the powder is I'll get some spots on the film that are small creases, maybe 1-4 of them and they are very short.

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With the soap method, I let it dry usually for about 10 minutes or so, but maybe I am applying too much? With the powder, I used to use a lot and now use much much less so it seems to help but when I am wet checking it, I usually have to just touch up a few spots with the heat. But the problem with the powder is I'll get some spots on the film that are small creases, maybe 1-4 of them and they are very short.

i dont think you can use "too much" soap. as for the creases, are you thinking of whats called peanuts? it sounds like thats what you're talking about when you say some come out, some dont. typically that is from over shrinking. so try to spread the heat around evenly instead of leaving the heat in one spot then the next. shouldn't need to wet check either, i dont think i've needed to wet check anything for a year or so. what anchoring method are you using?

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This can be so frustrating. Every time I think I have it down, I get a new bg or windshield that kicks my arse and I end up creasing. :blink:

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when I do a BG I will clean the window.

lightly mist the BG and go over the window with my soapy microfiber towel.

measure, load and cut film for BG.

by the time I get back with the film the window is dry.

If not hit it with your heat gun for a sec until it looks frosted like a donut. :blink:

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I don't wet check the soap method just for clarification...As far as peanuts, no these are small creases so maybe its caused by overshrinking in one spot compared to the next? I'll have to get some pictures hopefully soon here to show what I mean.

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I think I know what you are talking about as far as the creases. I think I got a TOTW once for this one...but cant find it...and now that I look...I seem to have lost my medal for it too. :boogie:thumb

Anyway, if you see those little "creases" appear...move a pocket of air from another area of the window, under the areas that appear creased....then give it another shot of heat. The additional shrink should take away those little "creases".

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