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Window Film and Fading


vquestfilms.com

As Tom mentioned, fading has a lot to do with filtering visible light in addition to heat and UV. No film will eliminate sun damage, it only has the potential to greatly extends the amount of time it takes to see the effects of sun damage. There are many other factors that come into play such as humidity, altitude is a biggie, and as mentioned... the type and color of your fabric as well as the type of wood on your floor. Believe it or not, some wood actually darkens with exposure to visible light so no matter what film you use (except blackout), you will see your floors darken especially around drapes and area rugs when pulled back.

Red dyes are notoriously unstable and they are usually among the first to show signs of sun damage.

In my experience at high altitudes, I have found anything above 60%vlt will show sun damage fairly soon as compared to high heat rejecting films that are 60% vlt and below. The darker you go, the better results in most cases but with some fabrics there is just no extending their lifespan unless you remove the windows entirely which is usually out of the question. :twocents

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We get this every day, fade is caused by a number of different things, U.V. Visible light, heat and some other misc issues. The inherent problem with all these films that promote a high VLT with great heat reduction, is that they are still allowing in huge amounts of visible and damaging light to pass through the glass. Thus expediting the fading process. You are likely to get several other posts here with different solutions but you really need to reduce light,heat and UV as much as possible to see any real results.

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Guest WKAindustrial

Posted

40% U.V. , 25% heat, 25% visible light & 10% other.........give or take

You may have to go with an IR film in the 40 or 35 range to get the fade control you desire.

:twocents

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Not all surfaces react to fade in the same way with that formula. I know it is just a general rule of thumb, but if they have silks or art on canvas, that is a bit different than oak flooring

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I currently have VKool 70 installed about 5 yrs ago. It has faded my furniture and floors badly. It was sold to me because of its great transparency. However, I have 2 competing priorities: transparency and fade reduction. I now have to replace the Vkool. I have quotes from Vista and 3M. My salesperson has enough VKool55 for one room but I don't think the difference between 70 and 55 is enough to protect my furniture.

Any recommendation on products?

Thanks

Margaret

Keep the film and add roller shades. They will knock out a lot of visible light, but you can still see through them. Put them down when the sun is coming through the window, or shell out the extra $$ and get motorized shades with a photo cell to automatically roll down when light hits the sensor. You dont have to get a very "dark" shade. 10%-15% openess should really help your fading issues.

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I agree with the thought of 35% VLT film! I would HIGHLY recommend Madico TSG 335! It has a great natural color and will do all of the things you are looking for!

I have no idea where you are located but I would be happy to answer any questions for you. info@sunglowf.com

Tim Jordan

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Guest Infiniteoptiks StL

Posted

I currently have VKool 70 installed about 5 yrs ago. It has faded my furniture and floors badly. It was sold to me because of its great transparency. However, I have 2 competing priorities: transparency and fade reduction. I now have to replace the Vkool. I have quotes from Vista and 3M. My salesperson has enough VKool55 for one room but I don't think the difference between 70 and 55 is enough to protect my furniture.

Any recommendation on products?

Thanks

Margaret

Margaret,

The first thing to do is have a professional come out and measure the UV light transmission and heat control capability of the existing film with the proper meters. Some of the better films use a UV laminate with UV inhibitors but without a gauge on it you don't know how effective it is and changing to Vista or 3M may have little or no impact and be a total waste of money. UV is 40% of the fade problem, heat is 25% and visible light is 25%. The remainder of fading is type of fabric, material, dye anchorage etc. Was there a specific piece of furniture or flooring that was the main problem or is it through out?

You most likely need blinds in addition to the film as suggested by another person here. I tell clients up to 70% fade control can be achieved but there are variables. You can learn a lot from a 30 year industry professional. Film may not provide the solution.

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Guest Infiniteoptiks StL

Posted

I currently have VKool 70 installed about 5 yrs ago. It has faded my furniture and floors badly. It was sold to me because of its great transparency. However, I have 2 competing priorities: transparency and fade reduction. I now have to replace the Vkool. I have quotes from Vista and 3M. My salesperson has enough VKool55 for one room but I don't think the difference between 70 and 55 is enough to protect my furniture.

Any recommendation on products?

Thanks

Margaret

Margaret,

The first thing to do is have a professional come out and measure the UV light transmission and heat control capability of the existing film with the proper meters. Some of the better films use a UV laminate with UV inhibitors but without a gauge on it you don't know how effective it is and changing to Vista or 3M may have little or no impact and be a total waste of money. UV is 40% of the fade problem, heat is 25% and visible light is 25%. The remainder of fading is type of fabric, material, dye anchorage etc. Was there a specific piece of furniture or flooring that was the main problem or is it through out?

You most likely need blinds in addition to the film as suggested by another person here. I tell clients up to 70% fade control can be achieved but there are variables. You can learn a lot from a 30 year industry professional. Film may not provide the solution.

I might add that I have sold Vista, Llumar, Madico, 3M and Huper Optik and fade control in comparable series is similar. It's the visible light and if you want it you're going to have fading.

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I currently have VKool 70 installed about 5 yrs ago. It has faded my furniture and floors badly. It was sold to me because of its great transparency. However, I have 2 competing priorities: transparency and fade reduction. I now have to replace the Vkool. I have quotes from Vista and 3M. My salesperson has enough VKool55 for one room but I don't think the difference between 70 and 55 is enough to protect my furniture.

Any recommendation on products?

Thanks

Margaret

Sorry to correct you, but the Sun is what faded your furniture and floors. Not the film. :thumb

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