hoosierwindowtek

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About hoosierwindowtek

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    Male
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    25+
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    Bloomington, IN.
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  1. Just did one of these, a 2017 model year... Although it's painful for my 49 year old fingers, I reached back to the corners and pressed down very hard until the carpet no longer touched the glass. Then I just used bulldozer tools to clean and squeegee the glass and film. 👍
  2. I'm more afraid of Neutral film on flat glass than I am of "automotive" film. What matters is the absorption of the film and neutral 20 or darker films absorb a lot. Interestingly, some ceramic films do too. There is a surprising amount of stuff to learn, and I would say read a lot of the literature companies put out. Specs and brochures.
  3. Profit margins are lower or similar to automotive, actually, but dollars per hour typically much higher, like 2 to 4 times that of automotive. 👍
  4. It's hard to take pictures of scratches, but more details are needed. Where is the scratch, and what's the age of the car? A lot of scratches that look like that are caused by ice scrapers in winter, for example. Is that on the inside or outside?
  5. I wish more in the industry would see that it's best to avoid the cheapest film and the cheapest customers. Even if the film were free, your time, experience, and liability are worth more than too many shops are willing to charge. I like to use the example of tire shops. The giant 20" wheels vehicles are getting stock these days take tires that cost $200 EACH, and relatively little skill to install. Meanwhile, many customers still think that a more than $200 tint job is overpriced even though it takes MUCH more time to learn the craft and even to do the installation. Not to mention the fact that the vehicle probably cost 40+ thousand to begin with. If nobody did cheap tint jobs, then customers would realize they don't exist anymore. Another problem is that the image of the industry is not that great.Too many window film installers selling themselves short and not selling themselves or the value of the product. People think, hey, I can get a 55" TV for $300 now, so everything must be cheaper. Why am I paying the same price for window tint that I did 10 years ago?
  6. Yeah, anyone who would put out work that bad should not be doing the work at all. My motto about window tinting is that the best window tinter is the one who is willing to admit his mistakes and fix them. I'd want a refund and install by someone who knows what they're doing.
  7. I've wanted to quit auto tinting for years, primarily because of age issues, but the added electronic complications make automotive tinting even less appealing. Since COVID, however, I have a beggars can't be choosers approach to earning money. Having said that, I'm not planning on tinting any Teslas ever.
  8. hoosierwindowtek

    17 F-250

    This discussion is a little old now, but for future readers, spray some lube on before pulling the mirror... Either really soapy water or WD-40. The WD requires more cleaning but works well... Or just cut a slit in the film.
  9. EW. I don't understand why a job like that can't wait until warmer weather. Often, though, single pane means old and old means dirty and other problems so it may have been a nightmare.
  10. It's hard to tell what some things are in the pictures but I'm confident the installation wouldn't be up to my standards. The white bits of contamination are big and very noticeable and there are puckers on the lines too.
  11. It may be different here in my area, but I do 99.9% of my appointments by phone and email because I do all work alone and by appointment from home. I don't have anyone here when I'm gone on errands, flat glass jobs, etc. so if they show up unannounced, many times there's nobody here. I only do 0 to a few cars a week, however, because I much prefer flat glass film so my situation is different but I rely on my website, reputation and google reviews to earn trust from first time customers. If you need to tint a lot of cars then you may need a way to be accessible to people much more than I am. Having said all that, If you want to make a good living tinting cars, NEVER just give a price when someone asks for it. Try to find a way to create your own style with people on the phone. Get them to relate to you by asking questions, showing them you care about them and their vehicle, use a little humor, explain what sets you apart, etc. One thing I tell people a lot is that I work alone, and spend more time on a car than many busier, cheaper shops do. Also, don't compete on price, compete on quality. Doing less work for more money is way smarter than more work for less money.
  12. If you turn out that much work, Why do you want someone else involved? If it's to lessen your own work load then I'd understand but if it's just to increase volume I think that since you're making bank with that kind of volume why bring in someone else to share profits with? Raise your prices, do less work and make the same/more money. Also if you don't already... try upselling ceramic film for maximum profits.