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When is enough?


Thirtyfive

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So I've had a couple jobs take a tumble on me.

I've been targeting commercial work lately so I've been somewhat prepared for this but it's getting to the end of me now.

E.g. Job one:

Architect gave me a schedule and a plan. There was really nothing specified so I made recommendations. They were signed off and I done the job. Got defected because it wasn't done in what was specd. Took me 2 weeks to get out of the contract admin that what they now want wasn't specd. Then I get the specs and a sample of another job for the same client done in another state, the sample doesn't match the specs for what they now want. So I've had samples of what was specd sent to them with the sample I was given asking them what they want. At the same time they are trying to get me to rush to get it done, all in between pulling rabbits out of my arse to get things done for them. This is all after me debating with them for the two weeks why I will be getting paid for the first installation. Then the contract admin had the nerve to tell me I should just do what is now specd because (quote) "the architect knows what he wants" after my compliance strips he designed were knocked for being no compliant.

My question is, has anyone ever just said "figure out what you want and then get back to me" because I've spent enough time and wasted valuable time to get this done for them when they don't seem to give a hoot about it? Honestly am a little hesitant to do anything other than get it sorted to just get the job done and get paid but don't appreciate being taken for a ride either.....

Is it now that I'm in I just gotta get it done and take it as a lesson learned to never do anything unless absolutely everything is on paper? Or would going to the extreme with making sure every little nook and crannie put some builders off as honestly compared to other trades in construction window film isn't too important to them?

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Arguing with architects is a no win situation. The majority of them think they walk on water and do not like when they are called out on a bad decision they made. We always get them to specify exactly what they want, and then provide a mock up for them to sign off on. The first mock up is included and we charge for subsequent submittals. The trick is to have a face to face meeting with them first so you can translate what they have in there head .. Into a window film application.

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Yeah I've asked for that.... Seemsa I'm not holy enough to meet unless he wants to defect me.

The last error was

Architect: why is this film not transparent?

Me: it's spec'd to translucent...

Architect: oh well this isn't what we had at our last job.....

I can take it that because now I won't go near the site until everything is 100% on paper that I'm probably not going to get requests from this builder anymore which I dint really want to, but to Prevent this happening again asking to physically meet with them isn't really too much is it? When I ask seems as though I'm trying to waste they're time in their eyes. Plus there's another 3 tinters at the door trying to get in

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You need to pick your battles. Some are not worth the investment of your time. Architects ( for the most part ) feel that their time is more important than yours. You need to make them understand that you are not a whipping boy and that your time is as important as theirs. Get them to sign off on everything and get in writing what is expected to be at the meeting. (Samples,mock up etc)

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So I've had a couple jobs take a tumble on me.

I've been targeting commercial work lately so I've been somewhat prepared for this but it's getting to the end of me now.

E.g. Job one:

Architect gave me a schedule and a plan. There was really nothing specified so I made recommendations. They were signed off and I done the job. Got defected because it wasn't done in what was specd.

I'm afraid little grasshopper you have been caught with your pants down perhaps a bit to do with inexperience and the big bad world of the flat glass industry. :console

I would have found out what film was installed interstate first and what brand.

Next I would have had a look at the corporate design (presuming you say it's frost) and asked to have the workings pdf'd to you.

 

Knowing that work was already installed elsewhere interstate, you could bet that the feature has to be exactly the same where you are.

 

If you can get out of this bag and get paid for what you have already done, then you're a clever cat at that.

 

Good luck mate but it doesn't look good for their is a power game going on here too.

 

Devil

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Arguing with architects is a no win situation. The majority of them think they walk on water and do not like when they are called out on a bad decision they made. We always get them to specify exactly what they want, and then provide a mock up for them to sign off on. The first mock up is included and we charge for subsequent submittals. The trick is to have a face to face meeting with them first so you can translate what they have in there head .. Into a window film application.

 

Yep, mock up, I just did this one last week and we just got the job today.

 

They even had to change the film selected, the one selected was 3M Fasara Ilumina-g and can you remove the lower 10" and install from the sill up on all of them, they called our biggest competitor before this and they were not impressed by them, perhaps they did not want to put a few samples up. 

 

You can also mail them some samples and have them select one and have them sigh off on it ( they will put a tag on it and sign and date it ) and send it back for your records with the contract. 

 

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:yeah

 

Don't get caught with your pants around your ankles.

 

Do your due diligence going through drawings.

 

A no REAL spec situation like :" apply 3M here" will ALWAYS need a sample sent. They will either stamp it approved or ask for a different selection.

 

"Match existing" projects are the most fun when hundreds of miles away and no one took a pic and its a custom cut. :lol

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So I've had a couple jobs take a tumble on me.

I've been targeting commercial work lately so I've been somewhat prepared for this but it's getting to the end of me now.

E.g. Job one:

Architect gave me a schedule and a plan. There was really nothing specified so I made recommendations. They were signed off and I done the job. Got defected because it wasn't done in what was specd.

I'm afraid little grasshopper you have been caught with your pants down perhaps a bit to do with inexperience and the big bad world of the flat glass industry. :console

I would have found out what film was installed interstate first and what brand.

Next I would have had a look at the corporate design (presuming you say it's frost) and asked to have the workings pdf'd to you.

Knowing that work was already installed elsewhere interstate, you could bet that the feature has to be exactly the same where you are.

If you can get out of this bag and get paid for what you have already done, then you're a clever cat at that.

Good luck mate but it doesn't look good for their is a power game going on here too.

Devil

Pretty much the lesson I learned here mate.

But I'm definitely getting paid for it or ill tear the shit down :pirate

Now that you say that this is probably what I should have done and what I'm going to do.....

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The hassle of flat glass agreeing on a shade and then the wait for payment via transfer sometimes I think stick to cars get payed quote over the phone

There is definitely a different set of mental tools needed for FG. But once you figure it out, you will simply scratch your head and wonder why you ever climbed into a car.

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